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 FSPH In The News

Week of: 
February 11, 2012 to February 24, 2012

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SPH RECEIVES HISTORIC DONATION: Dr. Jonathan Fielding, professor of health services at the School of Public Health, professor of pediatrics and Los Angeles County's director of public health, was featured in Feb. 16th reports on the $50 million donation he and his wife Karin have given to the School of Public Health. The school will use the gift to support its faculty, students and educational infrastructure, and to fund an endowed chair in population health. Coverage on the renamed UCLA Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health included articles in the Los Angeles Times, Associated Press, Long Beach Press Telegram, Los Angeles Daily News, Daily Breeze, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy; and on the KABC-Channel 7, KPPC-89.3 FM, KNX-1070 AM, CBS Los Angeles and Annenberg News websites. NBC-Los Angeles also reported Feb. 17th on the donation.

UCLA School of Public Health gets $50-million gift

UCLA School of Public Health gets $50M gift

UCLA's School of Public Health given record $50M gift

UCLA Public-Health Studies Get Surprise $50-Million Gift

UCLA School of Public Health receives $50M gift, largest in school history

UCLA's Public Health school is gifted a healthy sum of money

LA County Health Chief Gives UCLA School of Public Health $50M

UCLA Receives Historic Donation

LA School of Public Health Gets $50 Million Donation

SEXUAL MINORITY STRESS: The March 2012 issue of the American Journal of Public Health will publish a study led by Roger Detels, professor and interim chair of epidemiology at the Fielding School of Public Health, and Richard Wight, associate researcher of community health sciences at the School, finding that sexual minority stress, along with aging-related stress, jeopardizes the mental health of midlife and older gay men.

Stress and Mental Health Among Midlife and Older Gay-Identified Men

CHILDHOOD OBESITY: KPCC 89.3FM reported Feb. 15th, Examiner reported Feb. 16th and San Fernando Sun reported Feb. 23rd on UCLA research finding that a year-long parent-training program reduced the risk of obesity by 9 percent in low-income, preschool-aged Latino children. A control group that did not participate in the intervention showed a 16 percent rise in overweight and obese children. Dr. Wendy Slusser, associate professor of community health sciences at the Fielding School of Public Health, assistant professor of pediatrics and medical director of the UCLA Fit for Healthy Weight program at Mattel Children's Hospital, was quoted by the Examiner and San Fernando Sun.

Pilot program reverses weight gain in low-income Latino pre-schoolers

UCLA trains parents to reduce childhood obesity

Parental Training Helps Reduce Childhood Obesity

MEDICAL DEBT: Multiple media outlets reported Feb. 7th - 20th on a study led by Shana Alex Lavarreda, director of health insurance studies for the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the Fielding School of Public Health, showing a significant rise in the number of California residents with medical debt. Lavarreda was quoted.

Report: More Californians burdened with medical debt

More Uninsured Could Put Pressure on State

UCLA: Findings from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey

Vital Signs

Napa ranks last in Bay Area for job-based health coverage

Medical Debt Rises In California

Job cuts leave more California residents in medical debt, UCLA study says

Californians impacted by medical debt, UCLA study reports

Study: Uninsured Face Similar Debt as Medi-Cal Beneficiaries

Medical Debt Keeps Rising, New Report Shows

PARENTING: Research from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, a comprehensive biennial study of the health and well-being of the state's residents conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the Fielding School of Public Health.

Adoptive Parenting Increases with Same-Sex Couples

CHILDHOOD OBESITY: An article published Feb. 16th by HealthyCal about menu changes in Merced County School District cafeterias cited research from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the Fielding School of Public Health.

Merced schools tackle childhood obesity

Quotables

Gerald Kominski, professor of health services and director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the Fielding School of Public Health, was quoted in the Feb. 23rd Los Angeles Times about a sharp rise in health care premiums in California that are greater than underlying healthcare costs.

California health insurers to raise average rates 8% to 14%

Hilary Godwin, professor of environmental health sciences at the Fielding School of Public Health, was quoted in a Feb. 19th Los Angeles Times article about lead poisoning affecting California children.

Unsafe levels of lead still found in California youths

Dr. Wendy Slusser, associate professor of community health sciences at the Fielding School of Public Health, assistant professor of pediatrics and medical director of the UCLA Fit for Healthy Weight program at Mattel Children's Hospital, was quoted Feb. 17th in a New York Post article about cafes serving decaffeinated cappuccinos to children.

Make it a double tot! Brooklyn buzz over kid coffees

Judith Siegel, professor and vice chair of community health sciences at the Fielding School of Public Health, was quoted Feb. 14th by Reuters about research suggesting that individuals with chronic diseases who own pets generally have healthier hearts than those who don't own pets.

Pet owners' hearts may cope better with change

Dr. Michael Rodriguez, a faculty associate at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the Fielding School of Public Health and professor of medicine, was quoted Feb. 10th by The Californian about suicidal thoughts among Latina youth.

Salinas counselors aim to steer young Latinas away from suicide

Steven Wallace, chair of community health sciences and associate director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the Fielding School of Public Health, was quoted in a Feb. 8th EmaxHealth article suggesting suburban areas to be healthier to live in than urban or rural communities.

Healthiest places to live in the US