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Center for Occupational and Environmental Health & Environmental Health Sciences 411 Seminar | "Wildfires, Air Pollution, and Public Health"

Center for Occupational and Environmental Health & Environmental Health Sciences 411 Seminar | "Wildfires, Air Pollution, and Public Health"

Date 
Thursday, December 10, 2020 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
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Location 
Virtual via Zoom
Featuring 
Miriam Marlier, PhD, Assistant Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA
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Fire frequency and severity have been increasing in many locations around the world. Along with negative outcomes for public safety, climate change, and the environment, fires contribute to air pollution concentrations that are harmful to public health. However, it is challenging to separate the contribution of fires to overall air pollution exposure and associated public health outcomes. In this talk, Miriam Marlier, assistant profefssor of environmental health sciences for the Fielding School, will describe how a combined remote sensing and atmospheric modeling approach can be used to examine the connections and management decisions, climatic variability, air pollution concentrations, and downwind public health outcomes. Marlier will share results from two studies in Indonesia and California to explore various opportunities to reduce future air pollution from fires.

 

Miriam Marlier, PhD

About the Speaker
Miriam Marlier is an assistant professor of Global Environmental Change in the Environmental Health Sciences Department at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. She is an interdisciplinary environmental scientist with broad interests in examining interactions between environmental change and public health using remote sensing data and interdisciplinary modeling techniques. Some of her recent research projects include forecasting the influence of different conservation and development policies in Indonesia on fire emissions, air pollution, and regional public health outcomes, understanding the physical climate drivers of fire activity in the western U.S., and using remote sensing data to improve responses to natural disasters. Marlier previously worked as an Associate Physical Scientist at the RAND Corporation.

 

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