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JOB TALK | Dr. Reiner Rugulies -- "Adverse Working Conditions and Risk of Depressive Disorders: Epidemiologic Evidence and Controversies"

JOB TALK | Dr. Reiner Rugulies -- "Adverse Working Conditions and Risk of Depressive Disorders: Epidemiologic Evidence and Controversies"

Date 
Wednesday, January 26, 2022 - 9:00am to 10:00am
Location 
Virtual via Zoom
Featuring 
Dr. Reiner Rugulies, Professor of Psychosocial Work Environment and Health, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Adjunct Professor of Public Health at the Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Univ

Please note that this Job Talk is open to current UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty, students and staff. Thank you.

 

About the Speaker:

Dr. Reiner Rugulies is a professor of psychosocial work environment and health at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark, and adjunct professor of public health at the Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen. He is also editor-in-chief of the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health. He holds an MSc (1993) and a PhD (1998) degree in psychology from the University of Bielefeld, Germany and an MPH degree (2000) from the University of California at Berkeley. His main research focus is psychosocial occupational epidemiology, i.e. to examine the impact of psychological and social structures, factors, and processes at work on the onset and course of diseases and disorders, in particular cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders, mental health problems and mental disorders, sickness absence, and work disability.

About the Job Talk Lecture:

Mental disorders are a leading cause of years lived with disability. Exposure to adverse working conditions may impact workers’ mental well-being. But can working conditions cause the onset of a clinical depressive disorder, such as a major depressive disorder, as it is defined in diagnostic manuals? About 20 years ago, the first epidemiologic studies on this topic emerged. Today, there exists an impressive body of prospective cohort studies that have examined the association between numerous types of working conditions and the risk of depressive disorders. In the presentation, we will take a journey through the literature, have a critical look at key studies and will visit academic controversies. We will then reflect on what needs to be done to improve the evidence base, how to address the most important sources of bias, how to consider effect modification and the role of context, and how to design intervention studies to protect and promote workers’ mental health.

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