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“Still Separate and Unequal: How School Segregation Impacts the Health of Black Students”

“Still Separate and Unequal: How School Segregation Impacts the Health of Black Students”

Date 
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location 
Fielding School of Public Health, Room 43-105 CHS Los Angeles , CA
California US
Featuring 
Katrina Walsemann, PhD, MPH
Event Contact 

Porchia Toussaint

310.794.7500 | ptoussaint@ph.ucla.edu

The Center for The Study of Racism, Social Justice, and Health: Katrina Walsemann, PhD, MPH, of the University of South Carolina - "Still Separate and Unequal: How School Segregation Impacts the Health of Black Students"

Abstract: The role of segregation in maintaining and perpetuating racial health disparities has been widely examined. Most research focuses on residential segregation, even though school segregation plays an important role in determining which students have access to social and economic opportunities. In this presentation, I will provide an overview of historical trends in school segregation in the United States, discuss the possible mechanisms through which school segregation may impact the health of Black students, and examine the shortterm and long-term associations between school segregation and health.

Dr. Walsemann's research revolves around understanding how early life experiences can influence health and health inequities (e.g., gender, racial, and class) across the life course. She is particularly interested in the ways that institutionalized discrimination can influence physical and mental health during adolescence and as individuals transition into adulthood. Other projects focus on how marginalization (e.g., legal status, sexual minority status) impacts health and how debt, in the form of student loans, may modify the generally positive association between education and health.

When: Wednesday, March 14, 12:00 - 1:00 pm PST

Where: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, 43-105 CHS

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PDF icon Katrina Walsemann 3-14-18 (1).pdf94.42 KB