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A look at some of the news happening at the Fielding School.

FSPH Study Confirms L.A.'s CicLAvia Improves Air Quality in Host Areas

At Ciclavia in October (L. To R.): Madeline Brozen of the UCLA Luskin School Of Public Affairs; Christina Batteate of the Fielding School; Steven Gallegos of Breathe CA of LA County; Brian Cole of the Fielding School; and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.
At Ciclavia in October (L. To R.): Madeline Brozen of the UCLA Luskin School Of Public Affairs; Christina Batteate of the Fielding School; Steven Gallegos of Breathe CA of LA County; Brian Cole of the Fielding School; and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

A new FSPH study reveals that CicLAvia – a series of one-day events organized by a local nonprofit in which neighborhood streets are closed to motor vehicles so that people can walk and cycle freely – significantly reduces air pollution along its designated route and on other streets in the communities where the event is held.

“Los Angeles does not meet the EPA’s air quality goals, and traffic is a major source of the problem,” says Dr. Yifang Zhu, associate professor of environmental health sciences at FSPH and the study’s principal investigator.

“Not only does CicLAvia reduce the concentrations of traffic-emitted air pollutants, but we were also struck that the reduction of particulate pollution extends beyond the CicLAvia route.” The study’s co-authors are FSPH postdoctoral researcher Shi Shu, Professor Emeritus John Froines, Adjunct Assistant Professor Brian Cole and Christina Batteate (MPH ’12).

FSPH Establishes Formal Partnership in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

 

Kinshasa School Of Public Health Dean Okitolonda and FSPH Dean Heymann after the signing
Kinshasa School Of Public Health Dean Okitolonda and FSPH Dean Heymann after the signing

FSPH has launched a new partnership with the University of Kinshasa School of Public Health in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Professor Emile Okitolonda, dean of the Kinshasa School of Public Health, and FSPH Dean Jody Heymann signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the two schools last summer.

Located in the DRC’s largest city, the University of Kinshasa School of Public Health has had a longstanding research collaboration with FSPH Associate Professor of Epidemiology Anne Rimoin, who founded the UCLA-DRC Research Program in 2004. The MOU opens up the potential for new opportunities, including student internships, visits, and exchanges of faculty and scholars.

Inaugural Book Party

 

A celebration of public health books written and edited by members of the FSPH community took place last spring at the Fielding School. Dozens of books were on display during the book party, and several authors were on hand to talk with guests about their work.

Student-Led Water Filtration System Making an Impact

In 2014, FSPH students spearheaded a campaign to have an environmentally conscious water filtration system installed on the main floor of the UCLA Center for Health Sciences building.

The system was installed in January 2015 and, in less than one year, has already saved more than 26,000 plastic water bottles from ending up in landfills.

Join Team FSPH for the 2016 Los Angeles Marathon

For the second year in a row, the Fielding School is coming together as a community to raise money for student support by running the 2016 LA Marathon and Charity Relay on February 14.

Team FSPH raised more than $25,000 in last year’s Race to Health — enough to fund five students’ summer fieldwork. The students did invaluable work in the community: from youth development and violence prevention in Boyle Heights and East L.A., to extending access to health care for veterans and Native Americans in rural Virginia, to better understanding how social and economic assets impact the health of adolescent girls in Nairobi, Kenya.

For information about how you can join the Fielding School in running, supporting and/or cheering on Team FSPH, please call 310-825-6464 or visit Team FSPH's 2016 LA Marathon web page.

FSPH's Stairwell Makeover


Left: Before; Right: After

The project was envisioned, planned, and implemented by FSPH students including Tyler Watson (MPH ’13), Jimmy Tran, and Noelle Watanabe (MPH ’15), in collaboration with the Public Health Student Association, the FSPH Dean’s Office and UCLA’s Healthy Campus Initiative. All of the artwork in the Vertical Art Gallery is by artist Jane Gottlieb, who generously donated her work and time to the school.

The stairwell makeover project aims to increase stairwell use and will serve as a pilot for other buildings on campus.

Celebrating Our Teachers

 

 FSPH faculty, students and staff gathered last spring for the first-ever FSPH: Celebrating Our Teachers reception. The event honored Fielding School faculty members who have been recognized by students for their outstanding instruction during the 2014-15 academic year.

A PATH APPEARS: Action for a Better World

Photo courtesy Skirball Cultural Center/Photo by Robert Wedemeyer
Photo courtesy Skirball Cultural Center/Photo by Robert Wedemeyer

In November, the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles opened a new exhibit, A PATH APPEARS: Actions for a Better World, designed to inspire visitors to find their own paths to making a difference in the world. Dr. Neal Baer, adjunct professor at the Fielding School and co-founder of the school’s Global Media Center for Social Impact (GMI), is guest curator. The exhibition, presented in cooperation with GMI and the WORLD Policy Analysis Center at the Fielding School, explores four humanitarian issues — education, health, jobs, and empowerment — and reveals how organizations, both local and global, are developing workable solutions to these worldwide challenges. Rounding out the exhibition is GMI’s ActionLab (ActionLab.org), where visitors are invited to choose what has inspired them most and learn practice-proven methods for effecting change.

The exhibition is inspired by the best-selling book “A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity,” co-written by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists Nicholas D. Kristof, of the New York Times, and Sheryl WuDunn.