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News Archive

March 28, 2021 to April 3, 2021

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: Bay Area clinic Provide Vaccines to Homeless

CNN (April 2) referenced research led by Dr. Kathryn M. Leifheit, a postdoctoral researcher at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, in a story about a San Francisco Bay Area clinic working with local officials to bring Covid-19 vaccines directly to people experiencing homelessness. The study found that across the United States, those who did contract COVID-19 were 30% more likely to die than the general population. It also ran on MSN.

COVID-19: Risk of a New Wave as California Reopens?

KPCC-FM (March 31) interviewed Dr. Kristen Choi, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of health policy and management, about California’s reopening and the risks of another COVID-19 wave. “The key, of course, is that we do it safely,” Choi said. “California still has a mask mandate, and (people need to) continue to get the vaccine as it becomes available to them.” Choi was also quoted by the Chicago Tribune and Gruntstuff.

COVID-19: Survivor Speaks Out After Double Lung Transplant

Inside Edition (March 31) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the pandemic’s effects on younger patients. “The younger populations are not yet vaccinated. They don’t have herd immunity, and so they’re susceptible to this virus,” Rimoin said. “It’s not surprising to see rates start to rise in this population.” She was also quoted by the Fiji TimesSRN News, and the Long Island Press.

Farmer, Gardener, Parkinson's Disease: the Threat to the Countryside

Westdeutscher Rundfunk (March 31, Germany, starts at 04:40) interviewed Dr. Beate Ritz, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and of environmental health sciences, about the potential connection between Parkinson's Disease and pesticides. “(We) compared the data with the homes of Parkinson's patients - and in fact, these people lived much closer to the fields than those who were not sick,” Ritz said. Ritz was referenced in a related item by the Fresno Bee.

COVID-19: WHO Report – Virus Likely Came from Animals, Not Lab

CNN (March 30) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the recent WHO report on the origins of the coronavirus. “It’s important to understand what happened, because in order to prevent a pandemic like this from occurring again we really do need to understand the origins,” Rimoin said. “It’s not about pointing fingers; it’s about being able to understand what happened so it doesn’t happen again.”

COVID-19: Why Coronavirus Cases are Rising Again,

KPCC-FM (March 30) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about whether vaccination rates are steady enough to keep a fourth wave of the pandemic at bay. “When (we) look across and see certain states, for example, completely dropping mask mandates, or completely opening up all indoor venues, again without masking,” Kim-Farley said. “These are the things public health officials everywhere (are) alarmed about, because we are so close to getting to the end point of having vaccine for everyone.”

COVID-19: Removing Barriers to Vaccinations

MSNBC (March 29) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the national vaccination campaign amidst concerns about another infection surge. “We may be en route to seeing much more of what we’re seeing right now (an) increase in cases, 10% uptick in 27 states – that is not something to be taken lightly,” Rimoin said. “We’re still at approximately 15% fully vaccinated; that’s good news, but we have a ways to go before we can start to relax.” It also ran on Yahoo, MSN, and the Chestnut Post.

COVID-19: Why Latinos are Over-represented in Infections and Under-served for Vaccines

KNX-AM (March 29, begins at 07:00) interviewed Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the pandemic’s impact on Latino Californians. “It’s not because they’re Latino; (it’s) the occupations and the industries that they’re in,” Hayes-Bautista said. “Farmworkers can’t (work) in the safety from their home, (so) being far more exposed to the coronavirus every single working day.”

COVID-19: CDC Will Extend National Eviction ban through June 30

CNBC (March 29) interviewed Dr. Kathryn M. Leifheit, a postdoctoral researcher at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, about the CDC’s extension of a moratorium on most evictions across the country through to June 30. “When you’re looking at an infectious disease like COVID-19, evictions can have an impact not only on the health of evicted families, but also on the health of the broader community,” Leifheit said. It also ran on KNBC-TV (NBC affiliate, Los Angeles), KNSD-TV (NBC affiliate, San Diego), KNTV-TV (NBC affiliate, San Francisco), KXAS-TV (TX), WNBC-TV (NY), WMAQ-TV (IL), WBBM-AM (IL), WRC-TV (Washington, D.C.), New England Cable News, WBTS-TV (MA), WVIT-TV (CT), WJTC-TV (AL), ElMon (Spain), SoloDinero, Harlem World, Business Fast, Business Telegraph, OneNews, NewsColony, Celeb, and Consumer Affairs.

COVID-19: Mortality Among Latinos Higher Than Non-Hispanic Whites

KVEA-TV (March 29, Telemundo affiliate, Los Angeles) interviewed Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the pandemic’s impact on Latino Californians, and the risks posed during the upcoming spring break. “After a year in lockdown, the temptation to party during spring break can be very hard to resist," Hayes-Bautista said. “We caution that the death rate associated with COVID-19 for Latino young adults has been consistently more than five times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic whites.” Similar items ran on MyNewsLA, City News Service, KNX-AM, KCBS-FM, KTWV-FM, NewsMedical, and Science News. Also quoted was Dr. Paul Hsu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of epidemiology. “COVID-19‒related deaths can be considered a 'lagging indicator' for tracking an outbreak. They trail infections by a number of weeks and confirm what has already occurred,” Hsu said. “Unfortunately, they are the summary statistic of this deadly pandemic.”

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: Why is California’s Vaccine Website Such a Mess?

The Guardian (April 2) interviewed Dr. Shira Shafir, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about California’s My Turn website, launched by the state as a hub for scheduling. “The most significant problem we are having in California with the vaccine rollout is that glitches with My Turn are exacerbating existing equity issues,” Shafir said. “While we want everybody to get an appointment and get vaccinated as soon as it’s their turn, what we’re seeing is a massive divide between those who have the ability to navigate through the platform to find their appointment and those who do not.”

COVID-19: Questions About Coronavirus Variants, Answered

Consumer Reports (April 1) interviewed Dr. Peter Katona, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about coronavirus variants. “Viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, make imperfect copies of themselves as they move from person to person or from an animal to a person. This leads to constant mutations and new variants, (Katona) says.” It also ran on MSN.

COVID-19: California is Reopening Despite Warnings of a Spring Wave

The Los Angeles Times (March 31) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about California’s incremental approach to reopening. “If we look at the nation as a whole, we are obviously not going to be avoiding a fourth surge,” Kim-Farley said. “However, in California we are much better positioned, and we are still on a downward trend. If we can all play our part, we can continue on that downward trend.” It also ran in the San Diego Union-Tribune, MSN, Governing, and Newsbreak.

COVID-19: A Guide to Getting the Vaccine for Californians 50 and Over.

The Los Angeles Times (March 31) quoted Dr. Paul Simon, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and chief science officer at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, about the vaccination campaign in Los Angeles County. “Even with an increased supply of vaccine, we certainly can’t handle close to a million people over that first week, given all the other groups that are also currently being vaccinated,” Simon said. “But I would expect, over the following several weeks, the demand will diminish a bit, and things will open up, particularly as this vaccine supply continues to increase. And so I urge people to just be patient.” Similar items ran in the Los Angeles Daily News, Yahoo, KABC-TV, KRCR-TV, Asian Journal, Fox, LAist, MyNewsLA, the Los Angeles Patch, Whittier Daily News, Stockton Record, Visalia Times-Delta, and the Tri-County Sentry.

COVID-19: Los Angeles County Faces Familiar Challenges as it Enters Orange Tier

Capital & Main (March 31) interviewed Dr. Steven Wallace, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about Los Angeles County’s move from the red tier into the “orange tier” on April 5, including the potential impact of re-opening schools on multi-generational households. “You can say it’s a very low risk event. But if it does happen, it’ll be catastrophic,” Wallace said. “So that’s a low risk you might not want to take.” It also ran on LA Progressive.

COVID-19: Latino Grandparents Eagerly Await Family Reunions

La Opinion (March 30) interviewed Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the emotional and psychological impact of the pandemic on Latino families. “Latinos are more affected by the distance from our loved ones because we have a greater tendency than Anglos to be social, and when those ties are broken, it is harder for us to overcome it,” Hayes-Bautista said.

COVID-19: How Long is our Honeymoon?

The Los Angeles Times (March 30) interviewed Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about why the next few weeks will be crucial for the state to keep infection rates down and allow more people to get vaccinated. “I know it’s been very lonely for a lot of folks. It’s been hard,” Hayes-Bautista said. “So there’s a real temptation to bust loose just for one night because ‘it doesn’t matter.’ Well, it does matter.” Hayes-Bautista was also quoted in the Los Angeles Patch, Patient Engagement, Headtopics, and BridalAlley.

COVID-19: Some say ‘the Pandemic is Over’ in California; Experts are Worried

The Los Angeles Times (March 30) interviewed Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about public health officials worries that the next week or so — spring break combined with Passover and Easter Sunday — could unwind California’s hard-won gains against the coronavirus. It also ran in the San Diego Union-Tribune, Sacramento Bee, Modesto Bee, Bakersfield Californian, Merced Sun Star, San Luis Obispo Tribune, Yuba County (CA) Appeal-Democrat, Wichita Eagle, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Charlotte (NC) Observer, Raleigh (NC) News & Observer, Miami Herald, Bradenton (FL) Herald, and Los Angeles Times en Espanol.

COVID-19: Grass-Roots Groups are Helping the Homebound get Vaccines

The Los Angeles Times (March 30) interviewed Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about programs to bring shots to those too sick to leave home, a vulnerable population that some fear is being left behind even as vaccine access rapidly expands. “If you have the money to put your loved one in a long-term care facility, well then, they got vaccinated very early in this process,” Mays said. “In communities of color in particular, there are individuals who can’t afford that.” It also ran in the San Luis Obispo Tribune, Kansas City Star, Wichita Eagle, and Charlotte (NC) Observer.

COVID-19: Look Back to Assess, Learn From Los Angeles County Pandemic Response

The Los Angeles Daily News (March 29) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the lessons to be learned from the pandemic. “Public health requires clear, transparent and consistent messaging and everyone being on the same page,” Kim-Farley said. “I think that public health officials had a pretty clear intimation fairly early on (about the virus), but unfortunately that message was not being well received at the highest levels of government … so there was beginning to be a rift between public health officials and elected officials.” Including the Daily News, the story ran across seven of the Southern California News Group’s papers, including the Pasadena Star-News, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, Long Beach Press-Telegram, Whittier Daily News, Torrance (CA) Daily Breeze, and Ontario-Pomona (CA) Daily Bulletin.

COVID-19: California vs. Florida: Who handled the Pandemic better?

The Chicago Tribune (March 29) quoted Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the pandemic response in California and Florida. “Florida paid the price of a very heavy death rate early on,” Kim-Farley said. “California, by having delayed their onset of their worst surge, these patients were able to be treated in a more effective way, resulting in higher survival rates.” It also ran in the Hartford Courant, Baltimore Sun, South Florida Sun Sentinel, Orlando Sentinel, Allentown (PA) Morning Call, Annapolis (MD) Capital Gazette, and the Hampton Roads (VA) Daily Press, and Kim-Farley was also quoted by National Cyber Security.

COVID-19: Is California Blowing it on Unemployment Reform?

CalMatters (March 29) interviewed Dr. Jody Heymann, a UCLA distinguished professor of public health, public policy, and medicine, about the potential for a national unemployment system in the United States as a result of the pandemic. “Are we long past due for moving this to a federal system?” Heymann said. “I don’t actually think it’s realistic that all 50 states will be good at preventing fraud. And if they are, why would you set up that much redundancy?” It also ran in the Los Angeles Daily News, Riverside Press-Enterprise, Orange County Register, San Bernardino Sun, Pasadena Star-News, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, Long Beach Press-Telegram, Whittier Daily News, Torrance (CA) Daily Breeze, Ontario-Pomona (CA) Daily Bulletin, the Redlands Daily Facts, Palm Springs Desert Sun, Redding Record-Searchlight, Monterey County Herald, Santa Cruz Sentinel, Vallejo Times-Herald, Vacaville Reporter, Oroville Mercury-Register, Chico Enterprise-Record, Eureka Times-Standard, Lake County Record-Bee, Red Bluff Daily News, Willits News, Paradise Post, Woodland Daily Democrat, Fort Bragg Advocate-News, Ukiah Daily Journal, KXJZ-FM (Capradio, Sacramento NPR), KSOR-FM (OR), North Coast Journal, and the Mendocino Beacon.

 

FEATURES (Other)

Does Vegan Collagen Powder Really Work?

The Healthy (April 1) quoted Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about the health impacts of taking collagen. “It’s made from genetically modified yeast and/or bacteria, which have had human genes that code for collagen added to their genetic structure—hence the genetic modification,” Hunnes said. “I would say the evidence out there (of effectiveness) is scant at best.” It also ran on MSN.

Survived a Heart Attack? Long Work Hours Raise Your Odds for Another

U.S. News & World Report (March 30) referenced Dr. Jian Li, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, in a report on a study that found patients who returned to work after an myocardial infarction, or heart attack, and worked more than 55 hours per week had elevated risk for having a second cardiovascular event. Related stories ran on KMJ-AM (Fresno), KVOR-AM (CO), KARN-FM (AR), WOKI-FM and WTN-AM (TN), WOSH-AM (WI), WAAV-AM (NC), WAPI-AM (AL), UPI, Clinical Connection, HealthNews Report, Health Library, Healthcast, MedicallyPrime, DoctorsLounge, Drugs.com, Weekly Sauce, and HealthDay.

Longer Working Hours Increase Risk for Second CV Event After MI

Healio (March 29) quoted Dr. Jian Li, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, about a Journal of the American College of Cardiology study that found patients who returned to work after an myocardial infarction, or heart attack, and worked more than 55 hours per week had elevated risk for having a second cardiovascular event. “The study ... provides a new piece of research evidence that work-related factors play an important role in coronary heart disease prognosis,” wrote Li, who was not involved in the study. “Occupational health services are urgently needed to be incorporated into secondary prevention of CHD.” Similar items ran on MedicalXPress and Noticias Saude.

The Benefits of Taking Collagen—and What It Can’t Do

The Healthy (March 29) interviewed Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about the health impacts of taking collagen. “Once the genes are in place, the yeast or bacteria start producing what is essentially human collagen. Pepsin, a digestive enzyme, is added to the mix as well and you end up with an exact replica of human collagen,” Hunnes said. “Collagen supplements can be an expensive product, and the evidence for taking it for a healthy person just isn’t there.”

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