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News Archive

May 3, 2020 to May 9, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: The devil is in the details in reopening plans

MSNBC (May 9) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on. “Everybody is ready to find solutions and wants to get to work, but everybody is also very really concerned about their safety, as they should be,” Rimoin said. “We still don’t have in place the widespread testing available to everybody that we need, we don’t have the contact tracing capacity, and we really don’t have the nitty gritty of how we get people back to work, worked out.”

COVID-19: White House staff putting themselves “at great risk” by not practicing social distancing

CNN (May 8) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on reports that multiple members of the White House staff have been infected. “The coronavirus has been spreading by this mechanism, human to human transmission, since the beginning of this pandemic,” Rimoin said. “The fact that it is spreading in the White House, where people are not social distancing, they are not wearing masks, and they do not appear to be using the kind of methods that we are recommending to the rest of the public, is proof positive that if you don't social distance, you do not wear masks, you do not take these precautions, you put yourself a great risk.”

COVID-19: Viruses can remain present in the testes

CNN (May 8) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about research indicating the coronavirus may survive in the testes. “We've seen this with Zika, with Ebola, with many different viruses that they can live in the reproductive tract, and this can be for months after a male patient has recovered,” Rimoin said. “Finding the virus or finding evidence of the virus in semen is one thing, but whether or not it's actually infectious and can be transmittable is the next thing we actually have to understand … in the absence of understanding how this will be infectious, it's important for people to know that they should be practicing abstinence or safe sex.”

COVID-19: State of the U.S. response to the pandemic

CNN (May 8) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the state of the U.S. response to the pandemic, and the lack of positive results stemming from the use of the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine. “We still don’t have treatments that we are able to use en masse, we don’t have the appropriate testing, and we don’t have a vaccine yet,” Rimoin said. “This just underscores the need for rigorous, randomized, clinical trials to be sure we know the utility of the drugs that we are going to be using.”

COVID-19: Testing for active infection and antibody testing yield different findings

NBC (May 8) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the differences between being tested for active infection, via a PCR “swab” type of test, and antibody testing, which tells if someone has been infected in the past. “We are still unclear whether or not antibody testing will tell if you have immunity to the virus,” Rimoin said. “And if you do have immunity, how long that immunity may last and if a person can be re-infected after that immunity may wane.”

COVID-19: COVID is much harder to be able to contain than Ebola

Fox Business News (May 8, starts at 2:32) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about her work on Ebola and how it compares to the current pandemic. “Ebola is a very different kind of disease than COVID, and in many ways much easier to stop,” Rimoin said. “COVID is much harder to be able to contain, because it is spread in the air; Ebola, you stay away from people who have Ebola, and you’re very unlikely to get it.” The story also ran on Yahoo Finance.

COVID-19: “A lot of similarities” with Ebola

The Vice-TV (May 8, starts at 16:50) “Shelter in Place” program interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on comparing the pandemic’s course with her work in Central Africa researching Ebola. “We’re seeing a lot of similarities in what we’ve seen here in the United Sates and what we’ve seen with Ebola outbreaks,” Rimoin said. “The lack of preparedness, the panic of the population, the overflow in hospitals, the lack of testing capacity, we haven’t learned from the lessons of the past and we’re facing the same problems right now.”

COVID-19: How to safely re-open K-12 schools?

KPCC-FM (May 8, NPR affiliate, Los Angeles, starts at 05:25) interviewed Karin Michels, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology, about multiple pandemic-related topics, including how to safely re-opening K-12 schools. “Children are effected by COVID-19 to the same degree as adults and they can infect other people, also at the same degree,” Michels said. “The challenge is not only the classroom itself, but the breaks are a problem … these are children. It’s a little bit harder for them to always understand how important it is to keep social distancing.”

COVID-19: Precautions for the elderly as restrictions are relaxed

CapRadio (KXJZ-FM, May 8, NPR affiliate Sacramento) interviewed Kathryn G. Kietzman, a researcher with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for Health Policy Research, about the best courses of action for older Californians as the states restrictions are eased. “Seniors and people of all ages with health conditions need to really proceed with caution and to not assume that because things are starting to open up that means we're free and clear,” Kietzman said. “You can't bring back a life. So, for me, the scales need to be balanced toward protecting and saving lives at all costs.”

COVID-19: Pandemic exacerbates pre-existing inequalities

NPR’s (May 8) Science Friday program interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, on how the pandemic has exacerbated pre-existing health inequities. “We have a huge provider shortage in California, particularly those who speak Spanish,” Hayes-Bautista said. “Latinos are still twice as likely not to have health insurance, even after Obamacare.”

COVID-19: Will more people get sick? “Of course”

CBS (May 7) interviewed Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health epidemiologist and associate dean for research, about the risks the pandemic still poses to individuals of getting sick, if they do not practice physical distancing and basic precautions. “Of course. When you open up society, and they don’t protect themselves and wear face masks?” Zhang said. “Of course.”

COVID-19: Testing failures are “scandalous”

KPCC-FM (May 7, NPR affiliate, Los Angeles; starts at 00:55) interviewed Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on lack of progress on reliable testing despite the possibility the pandemic will re-appear later this year, akin to the 1918-20 influenza epidemic. “We’re really looking at the return of this virus; that’s what happened in 1918,” Jackson said. “We could be looking at very large increases (in infections), perhaps much more than we’ve looked at already. It is scandalous that we don’t have a much more reliable test for the presence of the virus, and much more reliable antibody testing.”

COVID-19: Overlooked impact on Pacific Islander communities

KQED-TV (May 6, PBS affiliate, San Francisco) referenced Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, on the need for data for Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander groups. The article also cites data from UCLA CHPR’s California Health Interview Survey on asthma, obesity, diabetes, and smoking rates among the Pacific Islander population. Similar stories ran in CalMatters, KXTV-TV (ABC affiliate, Sacramento), the Long Beach Post, ZeMag, and Pina.

COVID-19: “There will be incredible backlash from the scientific community”

MSNBC (May 5) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the Trump Administration’s reported decision to shut down the White House Coronavirus Task Force and the formal whistleblower compliant filed this week by Dr. Rick Bright, the ousted director of the federal Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA). “This is very important to have scientists who understand what is happening to be advising (decision makers),” Rimoin said. “There will be incredible backlash from the scientific community, from the general population, if we see a lack of scientific rigor involved in decision making.”

COVID-19: Post-pandemic pollution reductions are possible

KNBC-TV (May 5) quoted Yifang Zhu, professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about a study that found improvements in air quality could prevent approximately 14,000 premature deaths caused by air pollution-related illnesses. “It doesn’t need to take a global pandemic to create cleaner air and healthier lives,” Zhu said. “Climate action directly benefits people at a local and regional scale by creating cleaner air. The public health benefits are both immediate and long-term, and we can save the economy billions each year.”

COVID-19: Post-pandemic air quality improvements are possible

KCBS-TV (May 5) quoted Yifang Zhu, professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about a study that found improvements in air quality could prevent approximately 14,000 premature deaths caused by air pollution-related illnesses. “It doesn’t need to take a global pandemic to create cleaner air and healthier lives,” Zhu said. “Climate action directly benefits people at a local and regional scale by creating cleaner air. The public health benefits are both immediate and long-term, and we can save the economy billions each year.” The story also ran on MSNHealth, and similar stories ran on KFI-AM, AirQualityNews, Tech Explorist, Physorgnews, and Indiana Environmental Reporter.

COVID-19: The risk of getting the virus hasn’t changed

MSNBC (May 4) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the risks of prematurely relaxing restrictions designed to slow the spread of the pandemic. “This is where risk communication becomes so important,” Rimoin said. “Everyone is tired of staying home, but the risk of getting the virus hasn’t changed, and we don’t have the testing we don’t have the case identification  and we don’t have the contact tracing in place yet to do the kind of opening we’d like to see.” The story also ran on Yahoo News.

COVID-19: Stay-at-home fatigue?

CNN (May 4) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the idea of “stay-at-home fatigue.” “The problem is that the virus is still circulating in the population,” Rimoin said. “We still need to have all the social distancing measures in place (and) all the personal hygiene measures in place.”

COVID-19: Effective vaccines will take time; better testing is needed now

CNN (May 4) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on expectations about vaccines and the need for potentially better testing, including the FDA’s approval this week of an antibody test produced by the pharmaceutical firm Roche. “There will be a need for these studies looking at not only is (a vaccine) safe in humans but looking in people whether or not they are actually exposed and don't get the virus. And those do take time,” Rimoin said. “We need more tools in our tool box here. And Roche's test appears to have very good sensitivity and specificity.”

COVID-19: West Bengal has highest death rate

TimesNow (May 4, Indian television) interviewed Sudipto Banerjee, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics, on the mortality rates from the pandemic in the Indian state of West Bengal. “If the numbers provided by the government are not accurate, than these models are not going to perform well,” Banerjee said. “We have to look at this positively by going above the level of political bickering.”

COVID-19: Administration’s reduction of research funding is “a dangerous thing”

CNN (May 2) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the importance of federally funded research into potential zoonotic viruses before they move from animals into humans. “It's a dangerous thing to be cutting this kind of research,” Rimoin said. “There's a lot of research that needs to be done, but this kind of research should be being revved up.”

COVID-19: Higher mortality rates in Latino and African-American communities

Spectrum One (May 1) ) flagship “Inside the Issues” program interviewed Arturo Vargas Bustamante, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, about the pandemic’s impact on high mortality rates among minority and ethnic communities in southern California. “Latinos and African-Americans are dying at this portion of the higher rates than whites and Asians,” Vargas Bustamante said. “Number one are underlying health conditions and lower access to health care.”

COVID-19: Race and the pandemic

LACityView (May 1) interviewed Gilbert Gee, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, on bias and scapegoating of Asian Americans during the pandemic. “COVID-19 is a good example … the stress from discrimination leads to something called allostatic load, which is essentially wear and tear on our bodies from chronic stress, and that in turn effects other systems in our body including the immune system,” Gee said. “Words matter; whether we say “China virus” as opposed to COVID-19, really does appear to matter.”

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and on-line)

COVID-19: Mortality rates high among African Americans in southern California

CalMatters (May 9) interviewed Steven P. Wallace, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and associate director of FSPH’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about the impact of the pandemic on African Americans in Los Angeles, and how higher mortality rates mirror similar data from the before the pandemic “It doesn’t matter if you’re a millionaire basketball player or a kid who plays basketball on the corner,” Wallace said. “Income doesn’t buy you whiteness.”

COVID-19: What the young and old can teach scientists and doctors

The Los Angeles Times (May 8) interviewed UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology Dr. Timothy Brewer about the pandemic’s impact on individual across multiple age cohorts. “Anyone at any age can become infected,” Brewer said. “But we are seeing very different outcomes in what happens after people are infected.” The story also ran in the Sacramento Bee, Fresno Bee, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and the Hagerstown (MD) Herald-Mail.

COVID-19: “No one should feel completely safe”

The Guardian (May 8) quoted Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on California’s plans for a slow, phased recovery, where re-openings will vary across the state, in contrast to other U.S. states. “No one should feel completely safe as we remove restrictions,” Jackson said. “What certain places have done, where they’ve just thrown open the doors and said, ‘OK, we don’t have to keep our distance any more,’ is a colossal mistake.”

COVID-19: Does the adult film industry offer a model for testing and tracing?

STAT (May 8) interviewed Pamina Gorbach, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, on the possibility of the adult film industry’s 20-year-old Performer Availability Scheduling Services (PASS) program serving as a model for testing and tracing during the pandemic, including for workers who move from one job site to another, like convalescent hospitals. “People in nursing homes float, just like the adult film industry. They float, they work at multiple places with different rules and standards,” Gorbach said. “If one place they work screens for infection and one doesn’t, they can take the infection from one place to another.” The piece was also run by the Boston Globe.

COVID-19: Trying out Los Angeles’ testing program

California Healthline (May 8) quoted UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean and professor of biostatistics Ron Brookmeyer in a column about the Los Angeles’ testing program for residents, which is open to all 10 million residents of Los Angeles County. “That’s a story in and of itself: that they have the availability and they can make this effort,” Brookmeyer said. A version of the column also ran in the Washington Post.

COVID-19: An epidemiologist on what happens next

Goop (May 8) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for a Q&A feature on the likely course of the pandemic. “We have no way of knowing whether the virus has peaked or not because we don’t have widespread testing in place. That is the only way to know who’s been infected and who hasn’t,” Rimoin said. “Testing is what will help us understand when we’re going to be able to reopen the economy. Until we have a vaccine, we’re going to have to rely on understanding who’s been infected and who hasn’t, who has immunity and who doesn’t.”

COVID-19: Uneven rollout of prevention efforts brings distrust

Gothamist (May 8) quoted Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, on the likelihood that disparities in how the virus has impacted different communities will make New Yorkers more distrustful of the health system and authorities. “To this day HIV prevention workers are still trying to battle conspiracy beliefs about whether or not the government put HIV in certain communities and whether folks were able to get the same quality of care,” Ford said. “These kinds of concerns are exacerbated when the rollout of prevention efforts are so uneven. Even if there’s no conspiracy whatsoever, the very nature of the underlying inequalities might look like some communities are being targeted.”

COVID-19: Lockdown causes drop in South Africa’s air pollution

GroundUp (May 8, South Africa) referenced findings by Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health epidemiologist and associate dean for research, about the impact air pollution may have on the pandemic, including Zhang’s research into the 2003 SARS pandemic.

COVID-19: We don’t need a pandemic to get better air quality

The Daily Bruin (May 8) quoted Yifang Zhu, professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about a study that found improvements in air quality could prevent approximately 14,000 premature deaths caused by air pollution-related illnesses. “It doesn’t take very long for the air pollution to come back once you get gas emissions on the road again,” she said. “We want to communicate to the public that we don’t need a pandemic to get better air.” Dr. Jesus Araujo, associate professor of environmental health scinces, was also referenced.

COVID-19: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (May 8) reported seven items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts and the pandemic. Under “Preparedness and Response,” these included an April 28 commentary by Dr. Jonathan FieldingUCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and management, in The Hill; and a lengthy Q&A, “Why we need more demographic data on COVID-19,” by Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Under “Events,” it listed the May 11 Immigrant & Mixed Status Rights in the Time of COVID-19 discussion, organized by Janae Hubbard, equity diversity and inclusion program manager, and the May 12 FIELDING FOCUS | Public Health in a Pandemic: COVID-19 & Wellness and Healthy Living, led by Michael Prelip, professor and chair, Department of Community Health Sciences, and including panelists Ted Robles, professor of psychology, UCLA College of Letters and Science; Dr. Wendelin Slusser, associate vice provost, Semel Healthy Campus Initiative Center at UCLA; and Dawn Upchurch, professor and vice-chair, Department of Community Health Sciences, at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Under “Members in the News,” an April 23 Spectrum One interview of Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and associate professor of Community Health Sciences; and a May 1 Guardian interview of David Hayes-Bautista, professor of Health Policy Management. Under COVID-19-related “Academic Resources and Tools, the Letter listed the Breaking the Chain database, while under non-pandemic-related “Member Research And Reports,” it listed UCLA FSPH research investigates the effect of residential gas appliances on air quality, spotlighting a study led by Yifang Zhu, professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs at FSPH, and the  Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award awarded in April to Robert Kaplan, distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Health Policy and Management at FSPH.

COVID-19: The virus is winning: magical thinking won’t protect us

The New York Times (May 6) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, in a column by Nicholas Kristof prompted by the Trump Administration’s reported decision to shut down the White House Coronavirus Task Force. “We’re significantly hampered by lack of funding,” said Rimoin, who studies transmission of the coronavirus by people who are asymptomatic. The column also ran in the Seattle Times and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

COVID-19: Will our clean air last? Study says it’s possible

Medium (May 6) quoted Yifang Zhu, professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about a study that found improvements in air quality could prevent approximately 14,000 premature deaths caused by air pollution-related illnesses. “It doesn’t need to take a global pandemic to create cleaner air and healthier lives,” Zhu said. “Climate action directly benefits people at a local and regional scale by creating cleaner air. The public health benefits are both immediate and long-term, and we can save the economy billions each year.” Similar stories were also run by City News Service in Los Angeles, the Times of San DiegoScienceTimes, and ScienceBlog.

COVID-19: Facility, real estate industry giants team up in response

Facility Executive (May 6) referenced Dr. Jonathan FieldingUCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and managementin an item that cited a task force to research the health burden from COVID-19 and other respiratory infections. Fielding serves as co-chair of the panel formed by the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI).

COVID-19: Air pollution means more deaths. The warning is loud and clear for India

Scroll.in (May 6) referenced findings by Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health epidemiologist and associate dean for research, about the impact air pollution may have on the pandemic, including Zhang’s research into the 2003 SARS pandemic.

COVID-19: Latinos twice as likely as the population at large to be without health insurance

The Observer (May 6) referenced David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, on the impact of the pandemic on Latinos in the U.S., including that Latinos twice as likely as the population at large to be without health insurance.

COVID-19: UCLA expert speaks at Trinity County virtual town hall

The Trinity Journal (May 6) reported comments by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology Dr. Timothy Brewer at a telephone town hall hosted by State Sen. Mike McGuire (Senate District 2, Northern California). The event was one of several in a series where Brewer has presented at Sen. McGuire’s request.

COVID-19: The math behind mortality predictions

The Wall Street Journal (May 5) interviewed UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean and professor of biostatistics Ron Brookmeyer on the mathematics and modeling behind predictions about the pandemic, including the SEIR method, short for “Susceptible,” “Exposed,” “Infected,” “Recovered, which places people into those categories and then simulates transmission based on the biology of the virus, along with variables that include personal-interaction rates or potential seasonality. “People in these different buckets are interacting with one another, and every time a susceptible person bumps into an infected person, there’s a probability of transmission,” Brookmeyer said. “This plays out in this simulation over time, day by day, and you can see the infection spreading.”

COVID-19: Crisis threatens push for denser housing

The New York Times (May 5) interviewed Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on the long-term effects of the pandemic on transit and development. “I wouldn’t make any big development decisions right now,” Jackson said. “You have to plan out 100 years for building residences and creating buildings that are resilient and confront a multitude of hazards: terrorism, earthquakes, fires, climate change, energy shortages.” The story also ran in the Philadelphia Business Journal.

COVID-19: Infection rates rising in U.S. as states open up

The Associated Press (May 5) interviewed Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and associate dean for research, about data that shows the infection rate in the U.S. rising even as states move to lift their lockdowns. “This increase is not because of testing. It’s a real increase,” Zhang said. ““We’re one country. If we’re not moving in the same step, we’re going to have a problem.” The story also ran, or was referenced, in the Washington Post, New York Times, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, San Jose Mercury–News, Stars and Stripes, New Zealand Herald, Fox News, MSN, Arab News (English-language, Saudi Arabia), Khaosod (English-language, Thailand), KTUU-TV (NBC affiliate, Anchorage), KGNS-TV (Laredo, Texas), KSHB-TV (Kansas City), the Baytown (TX) Sun, and the San Marcos (TX) Daily Record.

COVID-19: Los Angeles’ low income neighborhoods hit twice as hard as wealthier neighborhoods

La Opinion (May 5) interviewed Randall Kuhn, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of community health sciences, on infection and mortality rates among low income Angelenos, including many deemed to be “essential” workers. "People who work in food preparation, supermarkets, or whatever job they can get because they are in poverty," Kuhn said. "We need to know much more, there must be much more evidence, and there must be much more analysis of who is getting sicker, with a real focus on race, neighborhood and poverty.” The story also ran on Black Voice News.

COVID-19: Overlooked impact on Pacific Islander communities

CalMatters (May 5) interviewed Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, on the need for data for Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander groups. “Common misconceptions that Pacific Islanders are Asian can muddy the data,” Ponce said. ”So can variations in how hospitals classify Pacific Islanders, half of whom identify with another race.” The article also cites data from UCLA CHPR’s California Health Interview Survey on asthma, obesity, diabetes, and smoking rates among the Pacific Islander population. The story was also run by KQED-FM (NPR affiliate, San Francisco), KXTV-TV (ABC affiliate, Sacramento), the Long Beach Post, ZeMag, and Pina.

COVID-19: Biking through the pandemic

NJ.com (May 5, Newark Star-Ledger digital edition) quoted Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, in a column on the importance of exercise in the pandemic. “What better way, particularly if you’ve got good climate, to get around?” Jackson said. “It helps your mental health and it saves you money!”

COVID-19: Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson give big boost to UCLA research

My Science (May 5) (May 6, Australia) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, in a piece about research being done at UCLA, and public support for the effort, including that of actor-producers Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson. “They wanted to learn what they could do to help as COVID survivors,” Rimoin said. “They had lots of questions. I let them know what we were doing at UCLA, and they were very interested and wanted to participate.” The story also ran on Mirage News.

COVID-19: Case rates and pandemic protection

Sciencenews (May 5) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, and Paul Hsu, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology at FSPH, on pandemic protection measures. “While every state is different, the coronavirus does not respect state boundaries,” Hayes-Bautista said. “A comparison of COVID-19 case rates is a logical place to start for all governors when assessing what to do with their pandemic protection measures.”

COVID-19: Pandemic increases social isolation

The Daily Bruin (May 5) quoted Kathryn G. Kietzman, a researcher with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for Health Policy Research, in a commentary on the problem of social isolation in the pandemic. “There’s a relationship between social isolation and mental health concerns like depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation that all have been associated with the experience of social isolation,” Kietzman said.

COVID-19: California restrictions may not be lifted entirely until mid- or late 2021

The Los Angeles Times (May 4) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, on California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s four-stage plan to gradually lift restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of the coronavirus. Kim-Farley said some restrictions are likely to be lifted this year, but the full end of the stay-at-home order may not be implemented until the middle or latter part of 2021. It also ran in the San Diego Union-Tribune, and was picked up by Newstral.

COVID-19: Los Angeles’ low income neighborhoods hit twice as hard as wealthier neighborhoods

CalMatters (May 4) interviewed Randall Kuhn, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of community health sciences, on infection and mortality rates among low income Angelenos, including many deemed to be “essential” workers. “People working in food preparation, food service grocery stores, whatever it might be because that’s the job they can get because they are in poverty,” Kuhn said. “We need to know a lot more, there needs to be a lot more testing and there needs to be a lot more analysis of who’s getting most sick, with a real focus on race and neighborhood and poverty.”

COVID-19: Openings could lead to a spike in new infections in U.S.

Xinhua (May 4) interviewed Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and associate dean for research, about concerns premature openings could lead to a spike in new infections in the U.S. “Many states that reopened economies are still seeing rising COVID-19 cases and deaths,” Zhang said. “Reopening may lead to sharp increase in new cases and local outbreaks, which may cause significant rise of nationwide COVID-19 cases and deaths.”

COVID-19: The pandemic is causing food shortages

Healthline (May 4) interviewed Dana Hunnes, adjunct assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on strategies to manage food shortages arising from the pandemic. “When we look at food deserts, which already tend to have food shortages, we run into even more problems of shortages in healthy items,” Hunnes said. “People will have to get creative with what is available, not be afraid to try new things, like plant-based meats, and look for other items they can try.”

 

FEATURES (Other)

The difference between purified, distilled, and tap water

Business Insider (May 8) interviewed Catherine Carpenter, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health adjunct professor of epidemiology, on the safety and quality of purified, distilled, and tap water. The quality of tap water depends heavily on location, and consumers should educate themselves to decide whether to drinking it or not, Carpenter said.

 

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