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News Archive

June 4, 2011 to June 17, 2011

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SENIOR HEALTH: A Fresno Bee blog and China's Xinhua News Agency reported June 14th on a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health that found that older adults who live in California's countryside are more likely than their urban and suburban peers to be obese, physically inactive and food insecure. Steven Wallace, associate director of the center and a professor of community health sciences at the school, was quoted.

Country living is not necessarily healthy living for seniors, researchers find

Rural elders more likely to develop health problems: study

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS: An article in June 14th's San Diego Union-Tribune about San Diego County launching a discount prescription drug program cited a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health showing the number of county residents who have health coverage.

County starts discount drug program

AIR QUALITY: The Long Beach Press-Telegram reported June 13th, the Los Angeles Times reported June 11th and the Associated Press reported June 10th on a study by researchers from the UCLA Center for Occupational and Environmental Health in the School of Public Health and colleagues examining pollutants and air quality in and around a rail yard in Long Beach.

Study looks at air quality of West LB rail yard

Air-quality regulators to study health effects of San Bernardino Rail Yard

Health study targets major Calif. rail yard

TIPS FOR PREGNANCY: Today's Parent ran a June 5th column by Dr. Michael Lu, associate professor of community health sciences at the School of Public Health and of obstetrics and gynecology, offering 10 tips to help women prepare for pregnancy. The article also ran in Hybrid Mom and Yahoo! Shine.

10 Tips to Help You Get Ready for Pregnancy

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: La Opinión reported June 3rd on a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health showing that more than a third of adolescents enrolled in California public schools do not participate in school-based physical education classes.

Aprender a comer bien

PREVENTION: El Deber newspaper in Santa Cruz, Bolivia interviewed Jack Needleman, professor of health services at the School of Public Health, regarding key public health measures that can prevent disease. Needleman emphasized the need for education campaigns to prevent endemic diseases such as dengue fever from becoming epidemics, the need for proper hospital staffing, and universal access to healthcare among underserved populations. He singled out the importance of timely health screenings as key to preventing diseases such as uterine cancer which is the number one cause of death among women in Bolivia.

Prevention is Key to Preventing Epidemics

Briefs

A June 9th Capitol Weekly article cited a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health showing that aging lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals in California are more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to suffer from chronic health conditions and to live alone.
Opinion: Health care issues often ignored for LGBT population

Thomas Coates, professor-in-residence of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, co-director of the UC Global Health Institute and an associate director of the UCLA AIDS Institute, was cited in a June 6th Washington Post column about the movement to ban circumcision.
Circumcision ban another attack on Judaism

A study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health was cited in a June 6th column in the Fresno Bee on the federal government's new MyPlate icon, designed to help Americans make healthier food choices.
What's on "My Plate" for obesity prevention?

Research by Dr. Michael Lu, associate professor of community health sciences at the School of Public Health and of obstetrics and gynecology, and Dr. Neal Halfon, professor of health services and director of the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities in the school, was cited in a June 4th Florida Today story about racial disparities in infant mortality.
Infant mortality: Racial disparities defy easy explanations

A June 1st Oakland Tribune article on teen stress cited data from the California Health Interview Survey, a comprehensive biennial study of the health and well-being of the state's residents conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health, showing that 14.4 percent of Alameda County teens received psychological counseling in 2006.

Quotables

David Hayes-Bautista, professor of general internal medicine and health services research and director of the UCLA Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, was quoted June 15th by the Los Angeles Times and June 3rd by the Ventura County Star about life-expectancy changes among U.S. residents.
Life expectancy of U.S. women slips in some regions

Latinos Live Longer Despite Health Obstacles

Dr. David Heber, director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition in the School of Public Health , commented June 13th in the Los Angeles Times about claims regarding the health benefits of pomegranate extracts and juices.
Extracting the facts about pomegranate pills

E. Richard Brown, director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in the School of Public Health, was quoted in a June 8th Los Angeles Times article about plans by health insurer Blue Shield of California to cut premiums for policyholders.
Blue Shield of California to cut many premiums 2.5% this year

Frederick Zimmerman, chair and professor of health services at the School of Public Health, was quoted June 8th by USA Today about a study showing that minority children spend an average of 13 hours a day using mobile devices, computers, TVs and other media - about 4½ hours more than white kids.
Minority kids spend most of their waking hours plugged in

Patricia Ganz, professor of health services at the School of Public Health and director of cancer prevention and control research at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, was quoted June 6th in a USA Today article about research on drugs aimed at preventing breast cancer.
Few women taking breast cancer prevention drugs

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