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Fortune: When Sexual Harassment is Legal

FSPH Dean and WORLD Policy Analysis Center founding director Dr. Jody Heymann co-wrote an opinion piece for Fortune about the 424 million working-age women who live in countries with no legal protections against sexual harassment at work.

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Date: 
Friday, November 17, 2017
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What do 424 million working-age women have in common?

They all live in countries with no legal protections against sexual harassment at work.

Over the past few weeks, millions of women have shared their experiences with sexual harassment in the workplace, from Hollywood to Silicon Valley to state and federallegislatures. Using the hashtag #MeToo, women recounted instances when they were subject to everything from demeaning comments to sexual assault, and denied promotions or opportunities when they objected to unwanted advances.

The #MeToo campaign has gone global, inspiring women to share personal accounts of sexual harassment in 85 countries and counting.

According to a new research from the WORLD Policy Analysis Center at UCLA, 68 countries—more than one in three—do not have any workplace-specific protections against sexual harassment. These legal gaps span countries in all regions and at all income levels, collectively leaving 424 million working-age women—including 235 million who are currently in the workforce—with no legal recourse when faced with an abusive supervisor or hostile work environment.

 

Read the full op-ed on Fortune's website