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Fielding School study finds declines in health equity in U.S. over 25 years

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Date: 
Friday, June 28, 2019
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Researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health conducted a survey study based on 25 years of data from more than 5.4 million people in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which suggests more work is needed on health equity in the United States.

The study assessed health equity for healthy days and self-reported health, using a novel measure of health equity as well as the disparities gap between black and white individuals, income disparities, and health justice (a measure of how health outcomes correlate with income, race/ethnicity and sex).

National estimates of change from 1993 to 2017 suggest downward movement in average health; improvement in the disparities gap between black and white individuals; a decline in other measures of health equity and health justice; and worsening income disparities. The authors suggest more or different approaches are needed to improve health equity.

The study was conducted by Frederick Zimmerman, professor of health policy and management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and Nathaniel Anderson, a PhD student in the Fielding School’s Department of Health Policy and Management, and published in JAMA Network Open.

 

Content from JAMA Network Open.