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FSPH's Prof. Chandra Ford presents on "Structural Racism and Health in Black Communities" at AAAS event

The American Association for the Advancement of Science asked Chandra Ford, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, to present on "Structural Racism and Health in Black Communities" in August as part of the AAAS's regular "SciLine" series of expert panels for the media and general public.

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Date: 
Thursday, August 13, 2020
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The American Association for the Advancement of Science asked Chandra Ford, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, to present on "Structural Racism and Health in Black Communities" in August as part of the association's regular "SciLine" series of expert panels for the media and general public.

At the Aug. 13 "SciLine" event, Ford focused on the implications of structural racism embedded in the health care system, including implications for access to that care and race-based differences in the experience of receiving health care, including historical perspective efrom the arlier days of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

"The nature of the racism exposure at each point of entry, the implications for inequities and the types of interventions that are likely to be effective depend in part on the stage of the care continuum at which the racism exposure occurs," Ford said. "Examples include not taking Black patients' concerns seriously and assuming that Black patients will not adhere to prescribed treatment regimens. Researchers have shown that white providers, for instance, prescribe medications at lower doses and later in the course of disease for Black versus white patients. The implicit bias literature has shown that these patterns are attributable in part to implicit bias."

Ford is lead editor of Racism: Science & Tools for the Public Health Professional, and most of her research falls into two broad areas: empirical research examining the relationship between specific forms of racism and disparities in HIV testing, care, and prognoses; and conceptual and methodological work to improve the tools available for studying racism as a public health issue. She also examines health disparities and intimate partner violence among LGBT populations. Ford earned a doctorate in health behavior from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

In 2016, Ford was named to the National Academy of Medicine Committee on Community-based Solutions to Promote Health Equity in the United States of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, and appointed co-chair of the Committee on Science of the American Public Health Association’s newly formed Anti-Racism Collaborative. Currently, she is a member of the Minority Affairs Committee of the American College of Epidemiology and Chair of the Faculty Advisory Committee of the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA.

At the event, Ford spoke along with Margaret Takako Hicken, associate professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, and Hedwig (Hedy) Lee , professor of sociology at Washington University in St. Louis. Ford's presentation begins at 12:22:

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