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Doctoral student Douglas Morrison recognized by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health for academic excellence with Blann Fellowship

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health doctoral student Douglas Morrison has been recognized for academic excellence and commitment to public health as a 2020 recipient of the Celia G. and Joseph G. Blann Fellowship.

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Date: 
Thursday, June 18, 2020
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UCLA Fielding School of Public Health doctoral student Douglas Morrison has been recognized for academic excellence and commitment to public health as a 2020 recipient of the Celia G. and Joseph G. Blann Fellowship.

“I am grateful to the Celia and Joseph Blann Fellowship for supporting my work in developing new methods for quickly and accurately monitoring HIV infection rates,” said Morrison, a doctoral student in the school’s biostatistics PhD program. “I am pursuing a career in biostatistics with the goal of improving public health, and I appreciate the fellowship’s encouragement in this endeavor.”

Morrison is a fifth-year doctoral student whose research at the Fielding School of Public Health (FSPH) has focused on infectious disease surveillance as well as assessment of mobile health applications.

“Doug stood out for the way he drew on his deep well of scientific curiosity to ask probing - and challenging! - questions that illuminated key concepts,” said Thomas R. Belin, professor and vice-chair of biostatistics at FSPH. “I appreciated that the thrust of many of his questions aimed at preserving rigor in drawing conclusions from statistical evidence, and I specifically recall office-hour exchanges on the reproducibility of scientific results that influenced my later approach to the subject.”

Morrison, whose hometown is Santa Rosa, California, has a 3.9 GPA and is a graduate of Stanford University (2010, MS, Statistics) and (2009, BS, Symbolic Systems, with a neuroscience concentration). He has worked as a researcher at the UCLA School of Dentistry, at FSPH, and at the Stanford University School of Medicine, as well as a teaching assistant at UCLA.

Annette Blann created the Celia G. and Joseph G. Blann Fellowship, awarded annually to doctoral students on the basis of academic excellence, to honor the memory of her parents. A 1954 UCLA graduate, she was committed to the enhancement of health and the promotion of well-being.