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"Hunger Grows in Bay Area"

KQED-FM interviewed Dr. May Wang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about her research into how hunger increased in California during the first months of the pandemic

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Tuesday, August 17, 2021
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The Bay Area saw some of the biggest increases in people signing up for food stamps during the pandemic. Home to the highest income inequality in California, the Bay Area’s hunger problem has been an issue of growing concern since well before COVID-19. The Biden administration announced Monday that it will approve the largest permanent increase in food assistance in the history of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Yet the Bay Area’s cost of living may mean that increase is only a drop in the bucket. We talk with researchers and advocates about the unique landscape of food insecurity in the Bay Area and how they’re addressing the problem.

KQED-FM's "Forum" talked with Dr. May Wang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about her research into how hunger increased in California during the first months of the pandemic.

“What the pandemic has brought up has magnified the disparities between the haves and have-nots,” Wang said. “A lot of people who lost their jobs, (many) of these folks were making ends meet, so when they lost their jobs, they really didn’t have much of a safety net.”

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