Skip to:

 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of February 14, 2021 - 12:00am

Week of: 
February 14, 2021 to February 20, 2021

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: Outdoor Dining Tent Safety

KNBC-TV (Feb. 19) interviewed Dr. Karin Michels, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology, about the safety of outdoor dining in tents or similar structures during the pandemic. “It’s still good to keep your mask on when you’re not consuming food or drinking,” Michels said. “You want to wear your mask … the best (is) outdoor dining without a tent.”

COVID-19: Los Angeles Cancels Thousands of Vaccinations due to Shortage

KPCC-FM (Feb. 19) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about vaccine shortages in southern California because of weather in the central United States. “Flights cancelled, (not) getting trucks to and from the airports, have really put things to a halt,” Kim-Farley said. “That means we have to postpone some of the vaccines being used at (local) sites.”

COVID-19: Why are There Disproportionate Vaccination Rates?

KPCC-FM (Feb. 19) interviewed Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about disproportionate COVID-19 vaccination rates. “I'm not sure that the finger-pointing is right now somebody trying to hold back as much as the system was broken and it delays this vaccine getting into the arms of those with the most vulnerable meeting to be vaccinated,” Mays said.

COVID-19: Homebound Residents Over 65 are Struggling to get Vaccinated

KCBS-TV (Feb. 18) interviewed Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about whether using neighborhood clinics would be the best strategy to get vaccines to medically fragile and elderly residents currently being cared for in their homes. “They know them,” Mays said. “That person is going to be much more comfortable with them, in terms of you’re going to be able to go into the home. You’re going to have health care providers who speak the language.” It also ran on Yahoo.

COVID-19: Can you Change Your Lifestyle After Getting Vaccinated?

Inside Edition (Feb. 18) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about continuing pandemic-related precautions, even after having been vaccinated. “It's not time to throw away the mask even if you are vaccinated,” Rimoin said. “You still want to wear a mask, (and) you still want to be in well-ventilated areas.” It also ran on MSN and Yahoo.

COVID-19: How do we get Teachers Back Into Schools, Teaching Kids?

CNN (Feb. 16) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about how best to safely re-open K-12 schools in the United States. “We have to really think carefully about what our vaccine priorities are right now and what our goals are,” Rimoin said. “Prioritizing teachers next is going to be very, very important to be able to get them back into the classroom comfortably, even in places where there is a high rate of community spread.” It also ran on CNN International.

COVID-19: How can the Public Health Care System Build Trust Among African Americans?

KCRW-FM (Feb. 16) interviewed Dr. Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, about racial disparities and medical outcomes, including during the pandemic. “Racism has always played a role in shaping health,” Ford said. “We can see it in the neighborhoods that we drive through, the disparities that we see that happen in health along racial and ethnic lines. What's different now is we're actually using the term racism to characterize the effects of racism.”

COVID-19: Racial Disparities of the Epidemic and Vaccination Rollout

HealthDay Live (Feb. 16) interviewed Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about racial disparities in the pandemic response and vaccination campaign, including vaccine hesitancy. “Some of this historical mistrust comes from not anything that is so far in the past, but it is actually things that are recent,” Mays said. “Those images are pretty powerful when they are out there, (and) People can think of ways that they have been mistreated in recent times.”

COVID-19: From Role Model to Trouble Spot

Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Rundfunkanstalten der Deutschland (ARD) (Feb. 15, German public radio, begins at 10:35) interviewed Dr. Beate Ritz, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and of environmental health sciences, about the state of the pandemic in California, including in Los Angeles, and how the pandemic has hit the poor. “It makes a huge difference if you work in the office or in management, then you can take the work home, you can do it through Zoom,” Ritz said. “Many of the Latinos and Black Americans who work in the service sector cannot take the work home with them.”

COVID-19: Wearing two Masks to Reduce Risks of Infection

NBC (Feb. 15) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about wearing two masks to reduce risks of infection. “It depends on the fit of your mask and how well it’s going to filter,” Rimoin said. “If you’re only wearing a cloth mask or you’re only wearing a surgical mask, wear both – that’s the bottom line.”

COVID-19: Get as Many People Vaccinated as we can

KNX-AM (Feb. 15) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about vaccine supply shortages. “It is very important to be able to get as many people vaccinated as we can, but we’re still constrained by the number of doses that we actually have to get in arms right now,” Rimoin said.

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: Optimism That Pandemic is Finally Dwindling

The Los Angeles Times (Feb. 20) interviewed Dr. Paul Simon, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and chief science officer at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, about the prospect the rest of 2021 will not replay the course of the pandemic in 2020. “I don’t want to provide a false sense of assurance here,” Simon said. “Unless they’ve had vaccination, (Americans) continue to be susceptible. I think we need to continue to be vigilant.”

COVID-19: Panel Discusses Vaccine Distribution Plan for UCLA Students

Vanguard (Feb. 20) quoted Dr. Peter Katona, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the safety of mRNA vaccines. “It is a new technology only for vaccines,” Katona said. “This technology has been used in other places, like cancer drugs for example, and the actual knowledge of the technology goes back 20 or 30 years.”

COVID-19: Communities of Color Struggling to Get Vaccines to Those in Need

HealthDay (Feb. 19) quoted Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about racial disparities in the pandemic response and vaccination campaign, including infrastructure in the healthcare system that serves poor neighborhoods. “We have community clinics that were needing to buy these ultracold freezers,” Mays said. “Right now, it's weeks to get them. Until you can meet the requirement, you can't have it. So, who had it first? Major academic medical centers and hospitals, because they had an infrastructure.” It also ran on MedicalXPress and Merck Manual.

COVID-19: Here's how to get the Vaccine

SELF (Feb. 19) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about how to get the COVID-19 vaccine. “The federal government is only distributing vaccines to states, and then it’s really up to the states,” Brewer said. “We are asking everyone to help us work together to make sure that people who need the vaccine the most first get it first.” It also ran on MSN.

COVID-19: Did Los Angeles’ Hospital Surge Cause Unnecessary Deaths?

The Los Angeles Times (Feb. 18) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about whether the hospital overcrowding seen during Los Angeles County’s winter surge may have contributed to the case-fatality rate. “I think that — even with the surge that we saw in the winter — that the case-fatality rate for each age group is probably improving because of our improved ability to care for patients,” Kim-Farley said. It also ran in the Los Angeles Times en Espanol, Sacramento Bee, Bakersfield Californian, and EMSWorld.

COVID-19: Just how bad was the Latest Surge?

The Los Angeles Times (Feb. 18) quoted Dr. Shira Shafir, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about research that suggests vaccines reduce the risk of transmitting the virus. “Those results are ‘promising,’ said Shira Shafir, an associate professor of epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health, but they’re not enough to allow everyone to ditch their masks yet.”

COVID-19: No Scientific Proof Antibodies Produced by Vaccines Will Turn Deadly

Lead Stories (Feb. 18) quoted Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, for a fact check about claims that mRNA vaccines will cause a surge of lethal "cytokine storm" deaths. Brewer said cytokine storms have been a problem for a few COVID patients in the late stages of the disease who suffer more from the immune system over-reaction than from the damage done by the virus. Steroids like dexamethasone have proven effective in quelling the reaction, he said.

COVID-19: Vaccine Rollout Leaves High-Risk Workers Behind

The Los Angeles Times (Feb. 17) cited Dr. David Eisenman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health and director of the UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters, about varying priorities of different elements of California’s population when it comes to the vaccination campaign. It also ran in the Sacramento Bee, Bakersfield Californian, Fresno Bee, Napa Valley Register, Wichita Eagle, Kansas City Star, Lincoln (NE) Journal-Star, Raleigh News & Observer, Miami Herald, and on Yahoo.

COVID-19: Black, Latino Residents Vaccinated at Lower Rates Than Whites

The State (Feb. 17) interviewed Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about ethnic disparities in the pandemic vaccination campaign in South Carolina, which has a large rural population with limited healthcare services. “I think vaccine hesitancy is a term that should get out of all the media’s vocabulary,” Mays said. “Any person who has a very complex health profile, they should be asking these questions to health providers.” It also ran in the Charlotte (N.C.) Observer, the Raleigh (N.C.) News & Observer, and South Carolina’s Myrtle Beach Sun.

COVID-19: What Doctors Want you to Know About the Vaccine and Pregnancy

Well+Good (Feb. 17) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about mRNA vaccines and pregnancy. “Since neither vaccine contains live virus and mRNA does not integrate into the human DNA genome, there is no theoretical reason to assume there is a risk to pregnant women or their fetuses,” Brewer said. It also ran on MSN.

COVID-19: Latest Evidence Suggests Wearing Face Shield With Mask for Optimal Protection

Fortune Herald (Feb. 15) quoted Dr. Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and senior associate dean for academic programs, about her study in Aerosol Science and Technology that found even a simple cloth mask provides significant protections against COVID-19 transmission, significantly reducing the spread of respiratory droplets. “We found that a simple cough could send particles more than six feet away, without face coverings. A cloth mask reduced cough particles by 77%,” Zhu said. “The combination of face shield and cloth mask improved the particle reduction to 89%.”

 

FEATURES (Other)

How California’s College Campuses are Handling Sexual Violence

KQED-FM (Feb. 19; begins at 09:30) interviewed Dr. Jennifer Wagman, UCLA Fielding School assistant professor of community health sciences, about the impact of a 2014 California State audit that examined how colleges in California responded to sexual harassment and sexual violence. “UCLA is one of the campuses that hasn’t done an assessment,” Wagman said. “We really don’t know what’s going on, on the campus.”

New Single-Payer Bill Intensifies Newsom’s Political Peril

California Healthline (Feb. 19) interviewed Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about AB 1400, a proposed single-payer health care system to cover all Californians, where current healthcare spending totals about $450 billion annually. “The mechanism you use to do that is almost certainly some form of taxation,” Kominski said. “It’s literally impossible for a single-payer system to move forward without capturing those current expenditures. They’re too substantial.” It also ran in U.S. News & World Report, on KHN, News-Medical, Health Leaders, Physician’s Weekly, Breaking Med, The Financial, BenefitsPro, and the Eugene (OR) Register-Guard.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (Feb. 19) reported seven items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and staff experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included COVID-19-related research by Dr. Ninez Ponce and the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) and risk communication best practices created by Dr. Deborah Glik, and Dr. Cathy Lang. The Letter also listed the Feb. 26 Minority Health Conference hosted by Dr. Chandra Ford and the March 3 46th Lester Breslow Distinguished Lecture, hosted by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean and distinguished professor of biostatistics Dr. Ron Brookmeyer. The Letter also listed a New York Times interview of Dr. Anne Rimoin, a Washington Post interview of Dr. Joann Elmore, and a report by Dr. Jack Needleman and Dr. Nadereh Pourat.

Researchers Win Grant to Study Economic Contribution of Hispanics

The San Fernando Valley Business Journal (Feb. 16) referenced Dr. David Hayes-Bautista and Dr. Paul Hsu, both with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about their research to identify the total economic contribution of Hispanics by U.S. state; the project, a joint effort with researchers at California Lutheran University, has received a $250,000 grant from the Bank of America.

Bay Area Cities go to war Over Gas Stoves

California Healthline (Feb. 16) interviewed Dr. Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and senior associate dean for academic programs, about research examining the health risks of long-term exposure to exhaust from gas appliances. “All of those have been shown to be detrimental to human health,” Zhu said. Similar items, also citing research of the issue led by Zhu, ran on KHN, Mother Jones, Slate, U.S. News & World Report, News Medical, Physician’s Weekly, Health Leaders, Clinique Amberieu, Grist, EnviroLink, Red, Green, and Blue, Black Voice News, and Technical Solutions.

A State Audit Tackled Sexual Violence on College Campuses. This is What's Changed

LAist (Feb. 16) interviewed Dr. Jennifer Wagman, UCLA Fielding School assistant professor of community health sciences, about the impact of a 2014 California State audit that examined how colleges in California responded to sexual harassment and sexual violence. “We know that the vast majority of individuals who experience some type of violence do not report it,” Wagman said. “It's been estimated that maybe 10%, maximum, of victims or survivors of assault or misconduct report to anyone.”