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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of February 28, 2021 - 12:00am

Week of: 
February 28, 2021 to March 6, 2021

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: Health Inequity Shown by the Vaccination Campaign is “a red Flag”

MSNBC (March 5) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the health inequalities in the U.S. demonstrated by the vaccination campaign. “This is a reflection of the structural inequity that we already have here in the United States,” Rimoin said. “These are very same populations that are affected the most with this virus are also the populations that don't necessarily have the same access to vaccines.”

COVID-19: Equity in Vaccine Distribution

KPCC-FM (March 4, begins at 01:00) interviewed Dr. Kristen Choi, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of health policy and management, about plans to reserve 40 percent of vaccines to areas that are hardest hit by the pandemic to help address racial disparities. “The rollout has been fairly complicated in California and certainly in Los Angeles, where we have a really large population and a lot of communities (that) have been hit disproportionally by COVID,” Choi said. “There are a lot of barriers to access for some communities, if you don’t have a car, if you don’t speak English, if you have trouble using computers or technology, it’s going to make it that much harder for you to make an appointment.”

COVID-19: All These Vaccines are Going to Protect you

Inside Edition (March 4) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the protections offered by the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines. “All of these vaccines are going to protect you against the things that matter the moist,” Rimoin said. “It’s going to keep you out of the hospital, it’s going to keep you out of the ICU, and it’s going to keep you from dying.”

COVID-19: “It’s Not the Time to Completely Open the Doors”

Inside Edition (March 3) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the potential risks of the decision by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to remove protective measures designed to fight the pandemic. “It’s not the time to completely open the doors, take off our masks, and get back to life as it used to be,” Rimoin said. “We still have high rates of cases, we still have high rates of deaths, and we don’t have vaccines in arms.”

COVID-19: “We Have Three Vaccines in our Arsenal now”

CNN (March 2) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the impact of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine on the global vaccination campaign. “We really need somewhere around 70%, 85%, with the world's population to be vaccinated, before we see a major difference,” Rimoin said. “It is just such a wonderful thing we have three vaccines in our arsenal now.” It also ran on CNN International.

COVID-19: “We Always Have to be on our Guard”

NPR (March 2) quoted Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the need to continue protective measures even as the vaccination campaign progresses. “I think we always have to be on our guard until such time as we do have a community immunity reached, or herd immunity as epidemiologists like to call it, so that we don't then see virus circulating in the community,” Kim-Farley said.

COVID-19: Vaccine Eligibility Guidelines Widens in Los Angeles County

KCAL-TV (March 1) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about vaccine eligibility in Los Angeles County. “A lot to be happy about. A lot to be optimistic about. We have good news, cases are down,” Rimoin said. “But we just need to make sure that we don't lose the gains that we've made.” It also ran on Yahoo.

COVID-19: Johnson & Johnson’s Vaccine is Authorized for use in the U.S.

KPCC-FM (March 1) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the vaccine, the first authorized for use in the U.S. that uses a viral-vector technology. “We’re very excited about having another player in the vaccine marketplace here, because of the fact (we) may have millions of does more available to us,” Kim-Farley said. “The vaccine is very effective; it’s been shown about 72% effective for diseases, (and) really up there in effectiveness for (alleviating) deaths and severe hospitalization.”

COVID-19: People Cutting Vaccine Lines in California

MSNBC (Feb. 28, begins at 01:25) interviewed Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about abuse of Californian’s vaccination campaign by line-jumpers abusing the reservation code system. “Human nature is ‘I’m going to get my grandmother registered, I’m going to get myself registered; if the system allows me to do it, I’m going to do it,’ ” Mays said. “Part of it is the system is not foolproof.”

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: Twitter Bots Alert Angelenos to Open Vaccine Appointments

Dot.LA (March 5) interviewed Dr. Kristen Choi, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of health policy and management, about the need for technical literacy to use on-line vaccine reservation systems. “A lot of people said they were only able to get an appointment because they had their husbands and three of their kids spending hours watching these websites and refreshing to get a slot,” Choi said. “It means that the only people who can get the appointment are those with the luxury of time and people to help them find one … those appointments are disproportionately going to the wealthiest and whitest communities.”

COVID-19: Faculty Discuss Interplay Between Pandemic, Barriers to Health Care

The Daily Bruin (March 5) interviewed Dr. Michael Rodriguez, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about the pandemic’s effect on health equity in the United States. “We need to have a system that … makes it easy for people who need care, to get care,” Rodriguez said. Also interviewed was Dr. Paula Tavrow,

COVID-19: U.S. States Can’t Resist Reopening Despite Daunting Case Counts

Bloomberg (March 4) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the potential risks of the decision by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and other governors to remove protective measures designed to fight the pandemic. “If people experiencing pandemic fatigue just start going back to pre-COVID behaviors of large indoor gatherings, no masking, no physical distancing -- this would be a setup for a fourth surge,” Kim-Farley said. It also ran on MSN and SFGate.

COVID-19: A Year Ago Today, Los Angeles Began its Battle

Los Angeles Magazine (March 4) referenced Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, in a piece about the anniversary of the City of Los Angeles’s fight against the pandemic.

COVID-19: Coronavirus Today – Your Questions Answered

The Los Angeles Times (March 3) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the safety of the vaccines. “Vaccines are safe and effective,” Kim-Farley said. “No vaccine is 100% safe or 100% effective. But (people) should feel confident in taking these vaccines because the benefits are going to far outweigh the risk except in unusual circumstances and most people will have experience in the past know if they had a severe reaction to one of these components.”

COVID-19: Get the Vaccine When You're Eligible

VICE (March 3) interviewed Dr. Shira Shafir, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about vaccine eligibility guidelines. “We want everybody to wait until it’s their turn to get the vaccine, and not a minute longer,” Shafir said. “From a public health perspective, it is better for that dose to go in an arm than for that dose to go down the drain, even if it means it’s going to someone who otherwise would not be eligible.”

COVID-19: More Variants Emerge Closer to Home

USA Today (March 3) interviewed Dr. Karin Michels, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology, about new COVID-19 variants that may already be more transmissible and resistant to vaccines. “A little bit less effective is not not effective,” Michels said. “Once the virus changes so much that the vaccines are useless… that’s going to be the (real) problem.” It also ran in the Palm Springs Desert Sun, Arizona Republic, Detroit Free Press, Des Moines (IA) Register, Indianapolis Star, Nashville Tennessean, Tallahassee Democrat, Yahoo and Noticias Ultimas, and more than 50 other outlets.

COVID-19: Some Changes to Linger, Even After Most People are Vaccinated

Popsugar (March 3) quoted Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about what life may look like post-COVID-19? “I suspect that people will be wearing masks at some point going forward, during winter seasons or even when not in a pandemic,” Brewer said. “There’ll just be more mask wearing than in past.” It also ran on MSN and Yahoo.

COVID-19: Why are Some People More Contagious Than Others

Trucs et Bricolages (March 2) quoted Dr. Peter Katona, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about why some people are more contagious than others in the pandemic. “Some types of viruses can be more contagious than others,” Katona said. “Current strain is not as deadly as it was six months ago, but it may be more contagious.”

COVID-19: $1.9 Trillion in Aid

Physicians News Network (March 2) referenced Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, in an item about the Biden Administration’s $1.9 trillion pandemic relief legislation.

COVID-19: Major Depression in Students in National Study

University Business (March 1) referenced Dr. Daniel Eisenberg, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, in a report on the annual Healthy Minds Study, which he leads and that assesses the state of mental health at college campuses across America. “2020 was an unforgiving year, punctuated by the COVID-19 pandemic,” the authors wrote. “Of the 33,000 students at 36 institutions that took part in the most recent web-based survey during the fall of 2020, 60% said they needed help during the past 12 months for emotional or mental health distress.”

COVID-19: This Moment Calls for Radical Care for all our Children

EdSource (March 1) published a commentary by Dr. Tyrone Howard, UCLA professor of education, citing research by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research about youth mental health. “45% of California youth between 12 and 17 reported having recently struggled with mental health issues during the pandemic,” Howard wrote. “Nearly a third of them experienced serious psychological distress that interferes with their academic and social functioning.”

COVID-19: Vaccines a High-Priority for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Communities

The Seattle Times (Feb. 28) cited data from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research on the recent statistics of COVID-19 cases and death rates among Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders for their story covering the need for vaccinations for the hard-hit community. Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders have the highest average case rate of any race and ethnicity in the state at 7,132 per 100,000 people and also lead in deaths per 100,000 with an average of 151 as of Feb. 21, according to the center’s data taken from their NHPI COVID-19 Data Policy Lab. It also ran in Talanei (American Samoa).

 

FEATURES (Other)

“We Should All Be Able to Have Babies Like White People”

The Nation (March 6) referenced Dr. Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, and Gilbert Gee, Fielding School professor of community health sciences, in a story about the cost of IVF treatments, poverty, and health equity.

Why You Should Read “Guns, Germs, and Steel”

Medium (March 5) referenced Dr. Jared Diamond, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, in a commentary on his Pulitzer Prize-winning work, Guns, Germs, and Steel. “It is an ambitious synthesis of history, biology, anthropology, environment, culture, geography, linguistics, and technology explaining why and how the modern world came into being,” the author wrote. “The geography of Europe and Western Asia was best suited to farming, animal domestication, free flow of information, and trade. Population growth enabled prosperity and advanced governance. Innovation accelerated due to widespread trade and competition.” A similar reference ran on Earth911 and Wine Industry Advisor.

Managing Stress With Breath in These Challenging Times

A Deadline Detroit (March 5) health advice column on managing stress cited data from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research on the percentage of caregivers who reported that emotions interfered with their chores and social lives, emphasizing the need to use strategies to minimize psychological stressors.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (March 5) reported eight items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and staff experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included a COVID-19-related message by Dean Ron Brookmeyer and interviews of Shira Shafir in The Guardian, Karin Michels in Rolling Stone, and Yifang Zhu in the Washington Post. The Letter also listed a March 10 forum featuring Leah Vriesman, and a March 10 webinar by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, led by Ninez Ponce. Also included was a Q&A by Steve Wallace and Maria-Elena De Trinidad Young, and an opinion piece in the San Diego Union-Tribune by Tram-Elayne Nguyen, a UCLA Fielding School of Public Health MPH student in the Department of Community Health Sciences.

Breast Cancer Mortality in Under 40s Resparks Screening Debate

Medscape (March 4) quoted Dr. Joann Elmore, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about breast cancer mortality in women under 40 and the importance of breast cancer screening for different age groups. “The majority of deaths due to breast cancer are in women over age 40,” Elmore said. “The breast cancer mortality rates per 100,000 (are) ~3 patients/100,000 for the under 40 age group, ~30/100,000 in the 40–69 age group, and ~80/100,000 in the 70 and above age group.” It also ran on MDEdge.

Study: 1 in 4 Immigrants Avoid Public aid for Fear of Consequences in California

La Opinion (March 2) quoted Dr. Ninez Ponce, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about immigrants’ user of public services. “The findings suggest the crucial need to provide accurate and easy-to-understand information about immigration rules and the impact they may have on public health,” Ponce said. Similar stories ran on KVEA-TV (Telemundo affiliate, Los Angeles), EFE, MyNewsLA, KPCC-FM, KFI-AM, KEIB-AM, Mirage News, Noticias XTra, Impacto Latino, LatinX Today, LaConexion, the San Fernando Sun, the Antelope Valley Times, Phys.org, and City News Service.

UCLA Presents 'Truth and Trust in Public Health' Event

The Culver City Patch (March 2) reported on the upcoming March 3 46th Lester Breslow Distinguished Lecture by Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg, who will present his lecture "Truth and Trust in Public Health." Fineberg previously served as president of the U.S. Institute of Medicine (now National Academy of Medicine), provost of Harvard University, and as dean of the Harvard Chan School of Public Health.

The Human Face of Energy Reinvention

Forbes (March 1) referenced Dr. Jared Diamond, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, in a commentary about how technical changes and human factors are enmeshed in the energy industry. “(Diamond) thought he’d be writing a story about the environmental consequences of human behavior, but that’s not what he found,” the authors wrote. “He discovered that how each society responded to external factors was as important as those factors. In other words, did people rise to the challenges of the moment?” Similar references were published in Reason, Curbed, GLP, and the Durango (CO) Telegraph.

Why We Should End Our Love Affair With Gas Stoves

The Napa Valley Register (Feb. 28) published a commentary citing research by Dr. Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and senior associate dean for academic programs, examining the health risks of long-term exposure to exhaust from gas appliances.