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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of July 19, 2020 - 12:00am

Week of: 
July 19, 2020 to July 25, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: “Shut it down, start over, do it right”

ABC News (July 25) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health (FSPH) professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about a letter signed by more than 150 public health specialists asking the Trump Administration to shut down the country. The letter was published the same week the U.S. reported 4.1 million confirmed cases and 145,000 deaths. “We all opened up too soon, we underestimated the virus, we underestimated spread,” Rimoin said. “We really are on track to lose many, many more American lives.” The letter was also signed by FSPH’s Pamina Gorbach, professor of epidemiology, and Ondine von Ehrenstein, associate professor of epidemiology and community health sciences.

COVID-19: Four million reported cases in U.S.; experts call for shut down

KPCC-FM (July 24) interviewed Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about suggestions by Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force, the pandemic is “plateauing.” “It’s much too soon to be declaring victory, and Debbie Birx may think she’s the head of that task force, but we all know that it’s being dictated by the President himself,” Jackson said. “As we go forward, it’s going to be very important that we don’t do more harm with the advice we give.”

COVID-19: Phase 1 precautions are the best current strategy

KNBC-TV (July 23) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the best strategies to respond to the upsurge in the number of confirmed cases. “What we really need to do right now is to minimize transmission of the virus to such an extent that our positivity rates go way down and the only way to do that is to really double-down on social distancing, mask wearing, hand hygiene,” Rimoin said. “We are just now catching up, and we will see wearing a mask part of our culture going forward.”

COVID-19: California has more cases, but New York has a lot more deaths. Why?

KNX-AM (July 23, starts at 01:17) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the differences in the pandemic’s toll in California and New York state. “If you look at who’s getting sick in California right now, over 50% of our cases are occurring in individuals between the ages of 18 and 50, and they only account for six percent of our total deaths,” Brewer said. “We’ve had about 525 deaths out of the roughly almost 8,000 deaths in this state in individuals under the age of 50, so that’s a big driver of the lower mortality rates that we’re seeing.”

COVID-19: “This is a serious disease”

The “Hey There, Human” (July 23, starts at 11:18) podcast hosted by actor Rainn Wilson interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the pandemic. “This is not an existential threat; the 1% or so infection to mortality rate is worrisome, but at the same time, the human race will survive,” Kim-Farley said. “This is a serious disease, and about 1% of those people who get infected can die from this disease, so that’s why we have to be careful about it.”

COVID-19: “A shining example of what you can do to make a difference”

CNN (July 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for a comparison of how governments in Central Africa and in the United States have responded to the pandemic. “Rwanda has done an excellent job. They responded very early and they have a national strategy. They had testing, tracing, isolation, and they did a really good job of implementing all of these blunt public health measures, which we know make an enormous difference,” Rimoin said. “They're a shining example of what you can do to make a difference.”

COVID-19: Is dining outside safe during the pandemic?

ABC News (July 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for the “Good Morning America” program on the risks of dining outside. “In a hotspot state, everybody needs to be doing what they can to reduce the spread of the virus,” Rimoin said. “That means social distancing, masks, all of the things that are really hard to do when you're eating out." The piece also ran on ABC News Radio, Yahoo News,  KABC-TV (Los Angeles), KGO-TV (San Francisco), KFSN-TV (Fresno), KTRK-TV (Houston), WLS-TV (Chicago), WTVD-TV (Raleigh), WPVI-TV (Philadelphia), WABC-TV (New York City), and China Press.

COVID-19: Death rates highest for Latino Californians, latest data show

KPBS-FM (July 22, NPR affiliate, San Diego, starts at 05:28) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management and lead author of a report that found Latinos in their 50s and early 60s are dying at a rate five times faster than whites and 1.5 times faster than Blacks in the same age. “You can't find a doctor who speaks Spanish, you don't have health insurance, how are you going to (get care)?” Hayes-Bautista said. “A lot of Latinos haven't gotten into the systems until after they've been exposed massively, eventually contract it, eventually develop a full blown case of the disease, and then they show up at the E.R." The report was also covered by Capradio, the Sacramento NPR affiliate. Similar items on Health News Digest and Alert also quoted co-author Paul Hsu, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health.

COVID-19: Vaccine 'hesitancy' will be a 'big problem' once a vaccine is available

MSNBC (July 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the potential problem of Americans’ hesitancy to get a vaccination, even after one is developed. “Making the vaccine is just hurdle number one, right here,” Rimoin said. “Vaccine hesitancy is one of the big problems that we face here in the United States, even now, pre-COVID for other vaccines.” The report also ran on MSN.

COVID-19: Latino workers see up to five times the deaths

KCET-TV (July 22, starts at 2:20) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management and lead author of a report that found Latinos between 50-64 are dying at a rate five times faster than whites and 1.5 times faster than Blacks in the same age. “These are structural situations,” Hayes-Bautista said. “What we see at a large scales is that Latino and people of color basically do the scut work that keep the state going, its economy going, but get very little of the resources: very little pay, very little health insurance, and very little access to care." The report was aired by FreeSpeech TV, and a similar item ran on KALW-FM.

COVID-19: Contact tracing is a very important part of control measures

KPCC-FM (July 21, starts at 01:15) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the need for contact tracing as a response to the pandemic. “Contact tracing is a very important part of control measures for COVID-19, but it’s not the only thing,” Kim-Farley said. “Many of the cases may in fact be asymptomatic and therefore people may not have presented for being tested … that’s why it’s so important to have the general measures in place of mask wearing, physical distancing, etc.”

COVID-19: Contact tracing training in conjunction with UCLA

KCRW-FM (July 21) referenced the contact tracing training academy managed by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health during a report on the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s contact tracing program. “A lot of the training is HIPAA (compliance),” said contact tracer Lupie Levya, a City of Los Angeles librarian. “And one of the main things is that you never tell people who it was who identified them as a contact, so confidentiality is a huge thing.”

COVID-19: “What went wrong in California?”

CNN (July 20; begins at 3:47) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on what has gone wrong in California’s pandemic response. “We opened up too soon; we didn’t have the virus totally under control,” Rimoin said. “People are not following the rules, not wearing masks, and not social distancing … we have to just shut down for now; I think that’s our only way out.” Similar stories quoting Rimoin ran on U.S. News & World Report, Heavy.com, KEYT-TV (Santa Barbara), KVOR-AM (Colorado Springs), KIDK-TV (Idaho), KVIA-TV (El Paso), WBBH-TV (Florida), WZPL-FM (Indianapolis), WBZE-FM (Tallahassee), WSYN-AM (South Carolina), WICC-AM (Connecticut), the Hartford (CT) Business Journal, Health Day News, The Doctors Lounge, F3, Digital Journal, Drugs.com, and Primer Momento (Dominican Republic)

COVID-19: “We made the fatal error of opening up too soon”

MSNBC (July 20; audio begins at 10:15) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the state of California’s response to the pandemic. “We did a great job at the beginning. We shut down. We did everything that we possibly could to slow the spread of the virus,” Rimoin said. “Then we made the fatal error of opening up too soon … we got one way out of this, and that’s by clamping down and using all the tools in our toolbox right now to be able to stop the spread of the virus.”

COVID-19: How to stop the spread as U.S. deaths top 140,000

Fox News (July 19) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the state of the pandemic response in the U.S. “The measures we have available to us right now are wearing a mask, social distancing, hand hygiene, and avoiding any kind of large gatherings at all,” Rimoin said. “This virus doesn’t care about your political affiliation, it doesn’t care if you believe in it or not, the virus is going to spread to anybody that is susceptible if that person is coming in contact with somebody who has the virus, and the thing is, most people don’t know they have it until they’re experiencing symptoms.” The story also ran on Yahoo News, Yahoo News (UK), and MSN News.

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: California is once again at the center of the crisis

The New York Times (July 24) interviewed Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and management, about the mixed messages Californians have received from local leaders, Gov. Gavin Newsom, and the White House, as the state grapples with the pandemic. “It’s very hard to go backwards,” Fielding said. “When people have been isolated and in some cases lost a job and are hearing all of these different things, what is the message? … what is the message, when you are hearing, basically, a cacophony?” The story also ran in the Hartford Courant, ABS-CBN (Philippines), and World24 News.

COVID-19: Latinos are more likely to get COVID-19 and diabetes. What does the combination mean?

The Sacramento Bee (July 24) cited research by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, led by Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management, that found Latinos are less likely to have health insurance coverage than other Californians. An estimated 13.7% of California Latinos remain uninsured.

COVID-19: Publicly funded vaccines must be priced fairly and available for all

The Hill (July 23) published a commentary by Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and management, about what will be done to ensure coronavirus vaccines are accessible for all. “While the Trump administration is pushing developers to meet faster timelines, providing supports in the form of favorable legislative measures and more than $7 billion in taxpayer funding so far, it hasn’t addressed an equally urgent question,” Fielding wrote. “What will be done to ensure vaccines are accessible for those who need them most? It is amazing that the answer is not yet determined, considering the gravity of the situation.” The piece was also referenced by KFF.

COVID-19: Should I get a test?

The Wall Street Journal (July 23) referenced Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, in a story about when individuals should get tested. Kim-Farley said someone who has travelled by air, for example, should consider getting tested.

COVID-19: Inside the work of California’s disease detectives

CalMatters (July 23) interviewed Alina Dorian, associate dean for public health practice at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on the contact tracing training being provided by the Fielding School and UCLA Extension on contract with the California Department of Public Health. “That’s a lot of people to be able to train really quickly and be able to control quality; our training academic model and the state’s model is that we’re utilizing state, county, and city employees (to) do this contact tracing,” Dorian said. “This is the time when there is so much to be said about human contact, about human understanding, and about human empathy … this is about each of us helping one another to be able to do what is right, for all of us.”

COVID-19: Voting by mail is easy, secure, and doesn’t put voters at risk of infection

The Daily Beast (July 23) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the risks of contagion in a polling place. “From a public health perspective, anything that reduces the amount of time that people have to spend together particularly indoors and in close contact would be valuable in preventing COVID-19 transmission,” Brewer said. The story also ran in The Daily magazine.

COVID-19: UCLA managing contact tracing training program

The San Luis Obispo New Times (July 23) referenced the contact tracing training academy managed by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health during a report on the San Luis Obispo County Department of Public Health’s contact tracing program. “We do investigate those diseases in a very similar manner. Clearly, we typically don't have this extended disease burden,” public health nurse Kristen Edler said. “I don't think it makes the news, and yet we are always working behind the scenes trying to protect the community and keep people safe.”

COVID-19: A single large party can completely exhaust local capacity to do contact tracing

Mashable (July 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on why refusals to follow social distancing guidelines can be so dangerous to the pandemic response. “It becomes very difficult to be able to nail down who was within six feet of somebody for 15 minutes or more,” Rimoin said. “Going a single party can completely exhaust the capacity of the health department to be able to do contact tracing.” The story also ran on Gizmo Sheets.

COVID-19: Vermont authorities try to sort out testing Snafu

SevenDays (July 22) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about problems in testing programs in Vermont, including the possibility that test processing kits or analyzer equipment may have been contaminated. “I would probably be calling my machine representative and having them check my kit,” Brewer said.

COVID-19: Orange County now has second-worst outbreak in California

The Los Angeles Times (July 21) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, on Orange County’s record number of confirmed cases, which reached 29,986 on July 21. “We have seen in Orange County more of a resistance to mask wearing,” Kim-Farley said. “So I think that we are seeing increased transmission — community transmission — in Orange County because of the lower levels of mask use.” A version of the story ran in the Sina Daily News (China).

COVID-19: California poised to overtake New York with most confirmed cases

The New York Daily News (July 21) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the increase in cases in California in recent weeks, which hit 9,216 in a single day July 20. “The bottom line is that we opened up too soon in California, and now we’re paying the price. We didn’t eradicate the virus. We just flattened the curve,” Rimoin said. “We got complacent.” A similar item ran on One Green Planet.

COVID-19: What does the future of movies and theaters look like?

Entertainment Weekly (July 21) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the pandemic mean for the future of movies. “We need to be socially distant, we need to be wearing masks, we need [to be] avoiding commonly touched surfaces, and that’s very hard to do in a theater setting,’’ Rimoin said. “How safe is it really? I, as an epidemiologist, would prefer a drive-in.”

COVID-19: Surge in cases causes contact tracing delay; Ventura County to add staff

The Ventura County Star (July 21) interviewed Shira Shafir, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health adjunct associate professor of epidemiology, on the importance of contact tracing. “We need to be able to test and figure out who is infected … once we know who is infected, that's where contact tracing comes in," Shafir said. “Timing is really critical … we know people can transmit before they manifest symptoms."

COVID-19: College football and the NFL should forget about 2020

The Los Angeles Times (July 20) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for a piece by sports columnist Bill Plaschke on whether the 2020 football season should be postponed, at both the college level and professional teams. “We’re seeing spikes all over the country, and we don’t have a national strategy, (and) still don’t have enough testing and tracing capacity, playing a very close contact sport like football would come with significant risk,” Rimoin said. “There’s no way to socially distance as you play, you’re sharing a lot of air space. I just think football players are going [to] end up in a situation where every interaction during a football game has the potential for spreading disease.” The story also ran in MSN Sports, Yahoo Sports, the Fresno Bee, Bakersfield Californian, the Charlotte (NC) News-Observer, Raleigh (NC) News & Observer, Bradenton (FL) Herald, Rome (GA) News-Tribune, Community Media Group, Atlantic Broadband, Daily Magazine, Alert, and AllUSANews.

COVID-19: As cases, hospitalizations, and positivity rates rise, what matters most?

The Ventura County Star (July 20) interviewed Shira Shafir, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health adjunct associate professor of epidemiology, on the importance of positivity rates. “The foundation on which we are building all of our control is the ability to test, know who is infected and then take all of our subsequent steps appropriately,” Shafir said. “If we are not testing enough people to know who is really infected in the population, then everything else is a house built on quicksand.”

COVID-19: UCLA FSPH faculty called on for Congressional town hall

The Los Angeles Daily News (July 20) referenced Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, who will speak at a virtual community town hall on the pandemic July 30 organized by U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., whose district includes Burbank, Glendale, and adjacent communities. Kim-Farley will speak on re-opening schools, along with Los Angeles Unified School District board member Jackie Goldberg. Similar items ran on Pasadena Now, the Crescenta Valley Weekly, and USA News Posts.

COVID-19: UCLA research investigates COVID-19 death patterns in California

Science News (July 20) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, and Paul Hsu, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, about how morbidity related to the pandemic has played has developed across California’s population. “The trend is pretty clear,” Hsu said. “In every age group, from young adults between 18 to 34 years to old elderly aged 80+ years, non-whites have higher death rates than whites.” A similar story ran in the San Fernando Sun.

Anti-racism as government policy? Los Angeles County supervisors will decide soon

The Los Angeles Times (July 19) interviewed Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, on proposals by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to evaluate county policies and agencies on how they address institutionalized racism. “Someone may say they've read about racism, they've studied racism, so therefore the experiences of people who have actually lived it don't matter quite as much, that they can speak on behalf of people who have lived racism,” Ford said. The story also ran in the Miami (FL) Herald, Fort Worth (TX) Star-Telegram, Fresno (CA) Bee, Bakersfield (CA) Californian, Community Media Group, and Hagerstown (MD) Herald-Mail.

COVID-19: Disney World bans eating and drinking while walking to promote wearing face masks

Variety (July 19) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, in a story on Disney World management’s decision to ban eating and drinking while walking to promote wearing face masks. Rimoin said it was a “terrible idea to be opening right now.” The story also ran on Reuters, Yahoo Finance, Netscape, the San Francisco Chronicle, SFGate, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, New Hampshire Union-Leader, Atlantic Broadband, Headtopics, Norwalk (CT) Hour, Greenwich (CT) Times, Stamford (CT) Advocate, Danbury (CT) News Times, Alton (IL) Telegraph, Armstrong Wire, My GVTC, TDS, The Newstrace, Edmonton (Canada) Sun, Ottawa (Canada) Sun, Winnipeg (Canada) Sun, Calgary (Canada) Sun, Toronto (Canada) Sun, Yahoo News (Philippines), MSN Indonesia, Line Today (Indonesia), Indopos (Indonesia), Sultang Antara (Indonesia), Lumpung Antara (Indonesia), Makassar Antara (Indonesia), Republika (Indonesia), Suara (Indonesia), Traveltext (Indonesia), The World News (Indonesia), MSN Italy, AnsiMondo (Italy), LaNuovaSardegna (Italy) Bresciaoggi (Italy), Gazetta di Parma (Italy), Tiscalli (Italy), Grupo la Provincia (Argentina), and La Nacion (Argentina).

 

FEATURES (Other)

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (July 24) reported 10 items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included dean and professor of biostatistics Ron Brookmeyer signing an open letter to President Trump, urging him “to relentlessly focus on science-based interventions to prevent further transmission of the COVID-19 virus.” The letter also included items connected with Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology; David Hayes-Bautista, professor of health policy and management; Paul Hsu, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology; Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences; Chandra Ford, professor of community health sciences; Anne Pebley, professor of community health sciences; Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management; Dr. David Eisenman, professor-in-residence of community health sciences; Dr. Steven Tuetsch, adjunct professor of health policy and management; Dr. Beate Ritz, professor of epidemiology and of environmental health sciences; and a UCLA-led study measuring progress in diversity in the health services and policy research field.

Mothers who live near gas flaring sites are at higher risk of preterm births

The Washington Post (July 23) quoted Lara Cushing, associate professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, who co-led a study that foundthe risk of premature births is 50% higher for mothers near natural gas flaring in Texas’ Eagle Ford Shale oil and gas region. “It’s on par with the increased risk you see for women who smoke,” said Cushing, who added that, unlike smoking, “it’s not really something you can do much about on an individual level.” Similar stories ran separately in the New York Times, the Baltimore Sun, and Green Matters.

Measuring progress in diversity in the health services and policy research field

Science News (July 23) quoted Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on a research project designed to measure how the field of health services and policy research (HSR) has addressed diversity and equity issues. “The need for diversity stems not only from the need to reflect the changing demographics in the U.S. population, but also from a need to ensure that the best talent from all backgrounds feels at home in HSR,” Ponce said. “An HSR workforce that reflects the people it serves helps achieve the results we need to move forward, equitably and effectively, and improve health care outcomes for all of us.” FSPH doctoral student Taylor Rogers was also quoted, and a similar story ran on Alert.

NASEM report recommends national framework for public health response

Emergency Management (July 23) referenced a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that recommends the creation of a National Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response (PHEPR) Science Framework to establish a sustained research agenda and the necessary infrastructure to advance understanding of what works and why in disaster preparedness and response. Dr. David Eisenman, professor-in-residence of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Dr. Paul Shekelle, professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and an FSPH alumnus (MPH, ’89 and PhD, ’93), and Dr. Steven M. Teutsch, an adjunct professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at FSPH, all contributed to the report. 

Study links gas flares to preterm births, with Hispanics at high risk

The New York Times (July 22) interviewed Lara Cushing, associate professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, who co-led a study that foundthe risk of premature births is 50% higher for mothers near natural gas flaring in Texas’ Eagle Ford Shale oil and gas region. “It’s on par with the increased risk you see for women who smoke,” said Cushing, who added that, unlike smoking, “it’s not really something you can do much about on an individual level.” The story ran separately in the New York TimesClimate FWD newsletter.

Jet aircraft exhaust linked to preterm births

MyNewsLA (July 22) quoted Dr. Beate Ritz, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and of environmental health sciences, about a study she co-led (published in Environmental Health Perspectives) that found pregnant women exposed to high levels of ultrafine particles from jet airplane exhaust are 14% more likely to have a preterm birth. “The data suggest that airplane pollution contributes to preterm births above and beyond the main source of air pollution in (the LAX) area, which is traffic,” Ritz said. Also quoted was Sam Wing, a scholar at the Fielding School who worked on the study. Similar items ran on MedicalXPress, ScienceBlog, Health News Digest, MedIndia, Multimedia Investments Foreign Affairs, infosurhoy, Brinkwire, Mirage News, Newsbreak, and Alert.

Teledentistry options may provide affordable access for Latinos

The Bakersfield Californian (July 22) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management and lead author of a study finds teledentistry can provide affordable oral care currently lacking for many in the Latino community. “Lack of Latino dentists, lack of insurance, high costs makes dentistry inaccessible to Latino communities,” Hayes-Bautista said. “Teledentistry may provide access and affordable options for underserved communities.” The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Odessa (TX) American published similar items.

UCLA FSPH professor to be portrayed in “Chicago 7” film

Variety (July 22) referenced John Froines, professor emeritus with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, in a story about the upcoming Netflix release “The Trial of the Chicago 7,” set for release October 16. The film, written and directed by Aaron Sorkin, will include actor Daniel Flaherty as Froines, who was acquitted by the jury in 1968 on all counts.

Study bodes poorly for pregnant women near flaring sites

KLRD-AM (July 21, Dallas) referenced a study, led by Lara Cushing, associate professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and published this month in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, that found the risk of premature births is 50% higher for mothers near natural gas flaring in Texas’ Eagle Ford Shale oil and gas region. “This is a great example of how we're letting out of control operations mess with Texas,” said Chrysta Castañeda, candidate for the Texas Railroad Commission, which oversees oil and gas production in Texas. “We just need to prevent the waste, and the violation of the laws that have been in place for 100 years.”

Risk of premature births 50% higher for mothers near natural gas flaring, researchers find

Texas Standard (July 20, Austin public radio) interviewed Lara Cushing, associate professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, who co-led a study, published this month in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, that found the risk of premature births is 50% higher for mothers near natural gas flaring in Texas’ Eagle Ford Shale oil and gas region. “Our goal with this study was to look at adverse birth outcomes,” Cushing said. “And what we found was (a) higher rate of preterm births among mothers who lived within about three miles of a large amount of flaring activity.” The study was also referenced by Real News Network.

Food additives to avoid

Consumer Reports (July 20) interviewed Dana Hunnes, adjunct assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about food additives, including sorbitol, a sugar alcohol that has about half the calories of sugar but also about half the sweetness. “Sorbitol brings water into the colon and acts as a laxative,” Hunnes said. “That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but at high doses it can have unwanted side effects, such as bloating, gas, and diarrhea.” It also ran on Yahoo Finance and PressFrom.