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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of June 21, 2020 - 12:00am

Week of: 
June 21, 2020 to June 27, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: Urban design and planning during epidemics

Epidemic Urbanism (June 27) interviewed Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about urban design and planning during epidemics. “In today’s world we think of parks as places of play, nature contact, and socializing, but during epidemics and disasters they can be used (inexpensively) as important locations for recovery and short-term clinical care,” Jackson said. “Epidemics are expensive, a lesson COVID-19 teaches us today.”

COVID-19: “Society needs to be moving in the same direction, but we have our civil society being torn out”

CNN (June 26) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, about the politicization of the pandemic response in the United States. “Wearing a mask has become a political statement which unfortunately, when everyone needs to be wearing masks and social distancing and having half the population not doing it, basically undercuts our ability to control this pandemic,” Hayes-Bautista said. “Society needs to be moving in the same direction, but we have our civil society being torn out, and it has been under this administration over a number of issues. This is just the latest one, but unfortunately under this one, people can die very quickly.”

COVID-19: Indoor dining may lead to spikes

MSNBC (June 26) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the best response to the rise of confirmed cases in the United States to more than 2.4 million. “If people are going to restaurants and they are sitting in places where they are going to be exposed to others because you’re not going to be eating with your mask on, you’re going to be likely to get infected if there someone near you who has coronavirus,” Rimoin said. “If people are out and about and life starts to go back to normal, we’re going to see a rise in cases. It’s pretty straightforward.”

COVID-19: “Politicization of wearing masks” is a problem

MSNBC (June 26) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the best response to the rise of confirmed cases in the United States to more than 2.4 million. “We are seeing a rise in cases, a dramatic rise in cases, an alarming rise in cases, and people are not doing what they need to do,” Rimoin said. “We need to be really doubling down and making sure that people understand the importance of the; the politicization of wearing masks and of social distancing is the problem.”

COVID-19: Worries about accelerating epidemic in California

RFI (June 26, French language public broadcasting) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, for a report (in a mix of French and English) on the increase in confirmed cases in California. “I don't think it’s normal at all," Brewer said. “They are disturbing. Firstly because the cases have never dropped but also because for the past few days, especially in Los Angeles County, hospitalizations have started to rise as well." A version of the report, also in a mix of French and English, aired on Radio France.

COVID-19: Hospitalizations, ICU cases on the rise in California

KTTV-TV (June 25) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on how to respond to the increase in cases across California. “We are still far away from having a vaccine. We still do not have therapies that make getting COVID less of a scary situation and so the best thing that we can all do is to do our part,” Rimoin said. “Wearing masks works, social distancing works but it means that everybody has to do their part … the reality of it is we’re going to see a lot more cases and a lot more deaths, if we’re not all careful."

COVID-19: Is it safe to send children to day care?

ABC News (June 24) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for the “Good Morning America” program on how to protect a child going to pre-school or day care. “The big question is how many kids are asymptomatically infected? Are they bringing it home to their household?” Rimoin said. “There’s a lot more research that really needs to be done.” The story also ran widely, including KABC-TV (Los Angeles), KGO-TV (San Francisco), KSRO-FM (Sonoma, CA), WLS-TV (Chicago), WPVI-TV (Philadelphia), WTVD-TV (North Carolina), and WCSJ-FM (Illinois).

COVID-19: “We need to be even more careful”

CNN (June 24) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on how the re-opening of California’s economy has contributed to the surge in confirmed infections. “Just because we had flattened the curve here in California early on does not mean we are out of the woods,” Rimoin said. “We are not safer today than we were before; in fact, we were safer when everybody was home. Now, we are reaching a point where we are much less safe, and we need to be even more careful.”

COVID-19: “It will not be taking a vacation anytime soon”

KPCC-FM (June 24, NPR affiliate, Los Angeles) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, for the “Air Talk” program on what Californians should do as the number of confirmed cases rise. “This virus is not going away, we have to be maintaining our vigilance and all playing our parts to make sure we are going out with facemasks on, we are trying to practice the physical distancing measures,” Kim-Farley said. “Otherwise we will not start seeing this reverse. It will not be taking a vacation anytime soon.”

COVID-19:If you’re opening too early, you're going to see a spike”

MSNBC (June 23) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on how a virus spreads and best preventative methods. “The laws of how a virus spreads, and particularly this virus, have not changed,” Rimoin said. “It has to do with how well we are doing at socially distancing, how well we are doing at wearing a mask, handwashing, all of these blunt public health measures,” Rimoin said. “This isn’t rocket science, this is just the way that it works in terms of virus transmission.” Versions of the story ran France24 and AlKhaleejToday.

COVID-19: “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”

CNN (June 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the failures of the U.S. national response to the pandemic. “We’ve been chasing behind this virus from the beginning,” Rimoin said. “We’re doing against what we always warn against: chasing behind these things. This is a clear case of an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

COVID-19: UCLA Fielding School professor named “trailblazer”

PBS Southern California (June 22, KOCE-TV and KCET-TV, begins at 00:16) has honored Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, as a “trailblazer” because of her work researching infectious diseases, including the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. “I think that this is a public health imperative, being able to understand viruses that are emerging, understanding where they are coming from, how people are getting them,” Rimoin said.

COVID-19: Is public understanding of the risks receding?

KPCC-FM (June 22) interviewed Dr. David Eisenman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor-in-residence of community health sciences and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters, about the dangers of public inattention to the risks of the pandemic. “We do need to be reinforcing that this is a real disease that is going on,” Eisenman said. “We do have this kind of `out of sight, out of mind’ kind of tendency, especially as the media re-focuses on different sorts of problems, COVID – sometimes for weeks at a time – recedes to the background.”

COVID-19: Black Americans are dying at more than double the rate of others

NBC News (June 21) interviewed Michael Jerrett, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, about the links between air pollution and disease, including COVID-19 mortality rates. “The more we study air pollution, the more we see that there is a very pervasive risk that affects most of the body's major organ systems and metabolic functions,” said Jerrett, who added that many associated conditions are also “key determinants of whether you go into very serious states of COVID.”

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: Infection rate spiking in California, a troubling sign of community spread

The Los Angeles Times (June 27) interviewed UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean and professor of biostatistics Ron Brookmeyer about the increasing rate of test results coming back positive in Los Angeles County - 8.8% at the end of last week, as compared to 5.8% two weeks ago. “At the end of the day, it’s really not telling us for sure what’s happening in the community,” Brookmeyer said. “A falling positivity rate could be reflecting just that there’s a skew now, a shifting of who’s coming in for testing … I would next be keeping a very careful eye on numbers of new hospitalizations.”

COVID-19: Why are California's cases surging?

The Guardian (June 26) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on why infections and hospitalizations are on the rise as the state reopens. “I think pretty much every place has rushed to reopen,” Rimoin said. “And as we reopen, of course we’re going to see more cases.”

COVID-19: Gatherings, lack of social distancing lead to U.S. surge

Xinhua (June 26) interviewed Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health epidemiologist and associate dean for research, on the increase in confirmed cases across the United States. “Some Americans remain highly resistant to wearing masks in public areas, thus they cannot well protect themselves and people around them. This is another important factor leading to the record-high daily increases," said Zhang, who added that improvements in some U.S. states suggest progress. “This shows that as the infection rate of the population increased, certain protection or immunity has established, which will help slow down the incidence of COVID-19." The story also ran on CCTV and Daijiworld.

COVID-19: New study confirms Black men’s fears about wearing masks during pandemic

Raw Story (June 26) quoted Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, on a University of North Carolina study that suggests wearing a mask can put African-Americans at risk. “Which death do they choose? COVID-19 or police shooting?” Mays said. “We have African Americans who have been dragged out of stores, who have been ordered by police and store guards to pull their masks down or take their masks off.”

COVID-19: LGBT community faces vulnerabilities

Medical Xpress (June 26) featured research from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law, including data from UCLA CHPR’s California Health Interview Survey. The question and answer feature focused on reports produced by The Williams Institute on health and economic vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in the LGBT community, and was syndicated from the UCLA Newsroom.

COVID-19: Summer parties during the pandemic? Ways to minimize the risk

The San Diego Union-Tribune (June 25) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on how to manage infection risks during summertime gatherings. “The safest thing is to stay isolated, but that’s not good for our mental health,” Rimoin said. “Staying safe is all about time, space, people and place. You need to think about who you’re inviting and what is their level of risk, not just for yourself but for everybody else you live with and want to see.”

COVID-19: Summer parties during the pandemic? Ways to minimize the risk

The Los Angeles Times (June 24) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on how to manage infection risks during summertime gatherings. “The safest thing is to stay isolated, but that’s not good for our mental health,” Rimoin said. “The bottom line is yes, you can see your friends and family, but you have to put a lot of planning and effort into it and be very cognizant of the risk. ... Staying safe is all about time, space, people and place. You need to think about who you’re inviting and what’s their level of risk, not just for yourself but for everybody else you live with and want to see.”

COVID-19: Getting a test is becoming harder, frustrating protesters

The Los Angeles Times (June 24) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, on limits on testing in California, even as the state saw a major jump in people sick with the virus. “Testing is the only way to truly know where the infection is, and where it’s going,” Brewer said. “So if you ultimately want to be able to contain and control it, you’re going to have to have testing as a major component of that strategy … clearly, we’re not where we need to be right now.”

COVID-19: Should Black men fear wearing a mask more than the pandemic?

The Mighty (June 24) quoted Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, on how African-Americans deal with the realities of racism and the pandemic, including that wearing a mask actually can put someone at risk. “The first assumption wasn’t these are people protecting themselves and others around them from the virus, it was the assumption of stealing or some ill will,” Mays said. “There is a quick judgment of what Black men are ‘up to.’” The story also ran on the Courier Daily, and the quote was drawn from an interview of Mays by STAT.

COVID-19: Thinking of going to the movies? Here's what you need to know

Entertainment Weekly (June 23) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about best practices for seeing a movie. “The rules apply no matter where you are … we need to be socially distant, we need to avoid crowds of people in the same closed spaces, we need to be wearing masks, we need good hygiene, and avoiding commonly touched surfaces, and that’s very hard to do in a theater setting,” Rimoin said. “I, as an epidemiologist, I would prefer a drive-in."

COVID-19: “It is imperative that as a nation we stand with science and public health”

The Public Health Institute (June 22) published a commentary co-written by Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and management, on the need for elected officials and the public to support public health officials’ effort to respond to the pandemic. Fielding’s co-authors include PHI President Mary Pittman, DrPH, and Tracy Delaney, PhD, with the Public Health Alliance of Southern California. “Our local public health officials face a double challenge: responsibility for managing the deadly COVID-19 pandemic, and a politicization of their work that puts their own lives and the health of their communities at risk,” they wrote. “We stand with our local public health officials. It is imperative that as a nation we stand with science and public health.”

COVID-19: Californians urged to wear masks amid record hospitalizations

The Guardian (June 22) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, about the upsurge in confirmed cases in California. “It really hasn’t helped that you’ve had some of these groups thinking that wearing a face mask is the first step in tyranny or communism,” Hayes-Bautista said.

COVID-19: Can isolation “bubbles” for players and staff allow the NBA to restart?

The Los Angeles Times (June 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the risks of proposals by the NBA to isolate players and staff in so-called “bubbles” as a path to restarting the basketball season. “I think the community risk is going to be important. The community transmission rate certainly impacts the risk of getting infected within these bubbles,” Rimoin said. “It’s like anywhere … the best thing we can all do is wear masks, social distance, use hand hygiene, avoid crowds and all do our best.” The story also ran on Yahoo Sports, and Rimoin was quoted in a related item in Gulf News.

COVID-19: Shortfalls in program to house 15,000 homeless people in hotels

The Los Angeles Times (June 22) interviewed Randall Kuhn, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of community health sciences, on the relative success of initiatives to provide hotel and motel rooms for the homeless in Los Angeles to limit the spread of the pandemic. “People that age should not be allowed to be homeless,” Kuhn said. “They deserve a chance to live out their time in dignity and to perhaps extend that time.”

COVID-19: What a second wave of coronavirus may be like

The Huffington Post (June 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the likelihood of a possible second wave of the novel coronavirus. “We’re in totally uncharted waters here … I think we would all love to know what’s going to happen (but) we’ve never been in this situation before,” Rimoin said. “When schools reopen and people are going back to the office ― a lot of people are saying we’ll go back to the office after Labor Day ― you could see a big spike in cases again because you’re going to have people coming together.” The story also ran on MSN, and a version ran in PanArmenian.

COVID-19: When will there be a second wave of coronavirus?

Good Housekeeping (June 22) interviewed Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and management, on why states may or may not shut down again. “You should expect continued increase in some, but not all, states … there are some disturbing examples of increases associated with loosening requirements for protective behavior, but the public desire for the 'old normal' is swamping common sense in some individuals," Fielding said. “For me, the distinction between waves isn't really helpful — the tough question is when, if ever, those in authority should reinstate some behavioral constraints?" It may make sense, but it's hard for political leaders to backtrack." The story also ran on Yahoo and Delish.

COVID-19: UCLA research referenced in report on Johns Hopkins’ pandemic dashboard

US News & World Report (June 22) referenced a research project co-led by Dr. Marc Suchard, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of biostatistics, that has received a $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a project he co-leads that is designed to help answer basic questions about the pandemic.

COVID-19: Pandemic raises interest in telehealth among underserved communities

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (June 22) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, about using telehealth techniques to extend care to underserved communities, especially in the wake of the pandemic. “We've been doing a lot of work and telehealth and telemedicine but now we're starting to think about how this would apply in teledentistry,” Hayes-Bautista said. “And in fact, the COVID pandemic, in a matter of a very few weeks, just turned the medical world upside down in terms of using telemedicine, whereas before it was only useful in remote locations.” The item also ran in the Global Banking and Finance Review.

COVID-19: As pandemic devastates communities of color, were federal minority health experts too quiet?

STAT (June 22) interviewed Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, on the lack of official voices spotlighting minority health concerns to decision-makers, in the White House or at the state level. “The federal government could have made some pronouncements, but I would have said it was the delay of states in recognizing: ‘Oh, who of my people can’t wash their hands frequently, and don’t have access to water?’ ” Mays said.

COVID-19: It’s easy to say “get tested;” it’s harder to do

California Healthline (June 22) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on how to get tested in a way that will yield useful information, including the reality that a negative result may not be conclusive. “A negative test a week after being exposed certainly reduces the likelihood that somebody is infected, but it certainly does not eliminate that possibility completely,” Rimoin said. “Any opportunity for spread in uninfected populations, this virus will take it.” The story also ran on CapRadio (KXJZ-FM, NPR Sacramento affiliate), in the Santa Cruz (CA) Sentinel, Monterey (CA) Herald, Salinas (CA) Californian, Woodland (CA) Daily Democrat, Coronado (CA) Times, Walla Walla (WA) Union Bulletin, Hagerstown (MD) Herald-Bulletin, Janesville (WI) Gazette, Lancaster (PA) News-Press, and Flagerlive (FL), as well as Physician’s Weekly, Health Mania, and News Medical.

 

 

FEATURES (Other)

Health-safety rating unveiled for all building types

Electrical Construction Maintenance (June 26) referenced Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor-in-residence of health policy and management,in a piece that cited a rating system of buildings related to the health burden from COVID-19 and other respiratory infections. Fielding serves as co-chair of the panel that created the system, formed by the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI).

Nearly two million California adults don’t get needed mental health care

Medical Xpress (June 25) quoted D. Imelda Padilla-Frausto, a researcher with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about a policy brief on mental health care published by the Center. “Because of the COVID-19 pandemic and the recent racial unrest in the United States, there is an anticipated increase in demand for public mental health services related to the multitude of hardships from the loss of job-based insurance coverage, to the mental and emotional toll of fighting against racial injustices,” Padilla-Fausto said. “As such, it’s vital to support policies that ensure the continued provision of care to the communities that need mental health support and services.” The story also ran on Mirage News.

Adult acne is real: here are the foods that can cause it

Healthline (June 22) interviewed Dana Hunnes, adjunct assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on dietary connections to adult acne, including sugary foods that lead to the body creating large amounts of insulin. “Insulin is a hormone secreted by our pancreas to address glucose levels in our blood. It would make sense that having a high sugar diet or one that is processed would affect insulin levels and other hormones within our bodies as well, some of which also apparently regulate acne,” Hunnes said. “Dairy has its own innate hormones, estrogens, progesterones, likely even some testosterone (as even human females produce some testosterone) that is likely exacerbating our own endogenous hormones and increasing the likelihood of a breakout.”

Hand in hand across Africa: A new style of partnerships changes lives on the vast continent

UCLA Magazine (June 22) interviewed Anne Anne Rimoin, professor of epidemiology and director of the FSPH UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for a feature on the hundreds of Bruin students, scientists, doctors and administrators who have worked hand in hand with local colleagues across Africa and the university's ties to the continent.

2020 UCLA FSPH graduate Eduardo Delgadillo recognized with Outstanding Service Award

UCDavis Magazine (June 22) quoted UCLA Fielding School of Public Health graduate Eduardo Delgadillo (MPH, ’20) in a story about his receipt of the UCLA Graduate Student Association’s 2020 Outstanding Service Award in recognition of his work to establish a hardship fund for UCLA graduate students impacted by the pandemic. “These were students who became the breadwinners of their families, were the caretakers for their families, maybe had lost a job and were full-time students,” Delgadillo said. “I heard heartbreaking stories, even where a family member had died.”

UCLA research cited in story on renters’ preference for smoke-free housing

The Los Cerritos News (June 22) cited research by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for Health Policy Research, led by Ninez Ponce, professor of health policy and management, that found 82 percent of Los Angeles tenants said they would prefer to live in a smoke-free apartment.

How often should an individual eat lunch meat?

Mel (June 21) interviewed Dana Hunnes, adjunct assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on dietary recommendations regarding the “deli meat” category of sliced and processed turkey, beef, and pork. “The least processed deli meats will be the healthiest of all the deli meats,” Hunnes said. “I would recommend up to one time per week for unprocessed deli meats, and only one time per month for processed. Deli sandwiches made with vegetables, you can eat several times per week.”

COVID-19: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (June 21) reported 11 items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts and FSPH efforts related to the pandemic or other news. COVID-19-related items included a CalMatters interview of Dr. Jonathan Fielding and a STAT interview of Prof. Vickie Mays, both listed under “ASPPH Members in the News”; a listing of the June 29 "Pride and Pandemic: Vulnerabilities to COVID-19 Among LGBT Adults in California" seminar co-sponsored by FSPH, under “Events”; and the updated COVID-19: Breaking the Chain of Infection pages in English and Spanish, under “Academic Resources and Tools.” In addition, the Letter listed Dr. Marc Suchard’s research project into the origins of measles, published in Science, under “Member Research and Reports”; the Class of 2020 Commencement Celebration under “School and Program Updates;” the PBS Southern California “Trailblazer” recognition of Prof. Anne Rimoin and  the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’s Eisenberg Award for mentorship for Prof. Thomas Rice under “Faculty & Staff Honors,” and the recognition of 2020 graduates Katherine Lin for academic excellence and Eduardo Delgadillo for outstanding service.