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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of May 9, 2021 - 12:00am

Week of: 
May 9, 2021 to May 15, 2021

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: New CDC Mask Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People

KTLA-TV (May 14) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the CDC’s newly-announced guideline on vaccinated people wearing masks in public. “The vaccines are not only highly protective against symptomatic infection, they’re also very effective against asymptomatic infections, the infections where you get it but you don’t know that you have it,” Rimoin said. “There’s also data to suggest that these vaccines are very effective against the variants that are circulating right now; the ones we know about it.” It also ran on Yahoo.

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)         

COVID-19: Is it Really Safe to Take off Your Mask?

The Los Angeles Times (May 14) quoted Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the federal government’s relaxation of face mask guidelines during the pandemic. “Those who are fully vaccinated can now get back to virtually pre-pandemic activities without concern of disease themselves,” Kim-Farley said. “However, they still need to realize that if they are around unvaccinated people that may be vulnerable — the elderly, those with medical conditions — they still need to practice caution in that setting.” It alos ran in the Bakersfield Californian.

COVID-19: 10 Things in Politics - Masks off

The Insider (May 14) quoted Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the CDC’s newly-announced guideline on vaccinated people wearing masks in public. “It doesn’t mean that you have to take your mask off,” Rimoin said. “It means that you can take your mask off.” It also ran on MSN and USA News.

COVID-19: Most Mask Guidelines for Vaccinated are Lifted

The Los Angeles Times (May 13) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the federal government’s relaxation of face mask guidelines, which now suggest fully vaccinated people can stop wearing masks in most places, both indoors and outside. “I am very excited that we have reached this momentous time when those who are fully vaccinated can now get back to virtually pre-pandemic activities without concern of disease themselves,” Kim-Farley said. “However, they still need to realize that if they are around unvaccinated people that may be vulnerable — the elderly, those with medical conditions — they still need to practice caution in that setting.” It also ran in the Sacramento Bee, Bakersfield Californian and the Guam Daily Post.

COVID-19: Vaccinated People can Ditch Masks and Distancing

Business Insider (May 13) interviewed Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the U.S. CDC’s new guidelines on wearing masks. “If you are still feeling vulnerable, if you’re somebody who has a compromised immune system, if you are in an area when you’re still higher transmission, then the conservative thing to do would be to continue to wear a mask in situations where you’re going to be around people where you don’t know what their vaccination status is,” Rimoin said. It also ran on MSN, Yahoo, and Nigerian News.

COVID-19: Mixed Messaging on Masks

The Los Angeles Times (May 13) quoted Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the state and local response in California to the CDC’s latest announcement on masking for those who have been vaccinated. “I am very excited that we have reached this momentous time when those who are fully vaccinated can now get back to virtually pre-pandemic activities without concern of disease themselves,” Kim-Farley said.

COVID-19: Opinion - Work Stress in the Age of COVID

Medium (May 12) published a commentary co-authored by Dr. Pouran D. Faghri, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, about the pandemic and work stressors. “Over the last 40 years, research has shown that many job stressors contribute to chronic stress which accumulates over time and changes the physiology of the body, contributing to obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and perhaps most importantly to immune dysfunction,” the authors wrote. “Those with comorbid conditions (obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease) have a higher rate of COVID-19 infection and related death.”

COVID-19: Fear Leaves Hundreds of Latino Students out of Classrooms

La Opinion (May 12) cited research by Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the toll the pandemic has taken on Latino Californians. “Latinos are vulnerable to the highly transmissible coronavirus because they are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to work essential jobs that expose them to the public, (Hayes-Bautista ) said … they are more likely to lack health insurance, which may make them less likely to seek medical care.” Similar pieces ran in the Chicago Tribune, PBS, Orlando Sentinel, Medscape, MedicalXPress, and Physician’s Weekly.

COVID-19: There’s Growing Confidence That the Worst is Behind California

The Los Angeles Times (May 11) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the possibility California has experienced the worst of the pandemic and that another disastrous wave is unlikely as vaccinations increase and case rates keep plunging. “I think that we are going in the right direction,” Kim-Farley said. “We will never have a surge like we had during the viral tsunami of the post-holiday season, just because now we have so many people vaccinated, and so many people have got natural immunity from having had the disease.” Similar items ran on KTLA-TV, MSN, Yahoo, and in the San Diego Union-Tribune, SFGate, Bakersfield Californian, and Los Angeles Patch.

COVID-19: Rethinking Herd Immunity

The Los Angeles Times (May 11) quoted Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the likelihood California has experienced the worst of the pandemic. “We may see some increases from time to time, especially if the virus gets into pockets of unimmunized people,” Kim-Farley said. “But we’re not going to see these major threats that occurred to us previously.”

COVID-19: Fears Keep Many Latino Kids out of Classrooms

California Healthline (May 11) cited research by Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the toll the pandemic has taken on Latino Californians. “Latinos are vulnerable to the highly transmissible coronavirus because they are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to work essential jobs that expose them to the public, (Hayes-Bautista ) said … they are more likely to lack health insurance, which may make them less likely to seek medical care, (and) they are more likely to live in multigenerational households, which means the virus can spread quickly and easily within families.” It also ran on KHN and EFE (Spain).

COVID-19: Sick and Tired: UCLA Professor Chases the History of Fatigue

The Palos Verdes Peninsula News (May 11) interviewed Dr. Emily K. Abel, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor emeritus, about her new book Sick and Tired – An Intimate History of Fatigue, published in April by the UNC Press. “People think that if there’s no medical explanation, there’s no medical problem  … maybe there will be a medical explanation — at a later time,” Abel said. “Long COVID is showing us that fatigue really is an important issue.”

COVID-19: How We Address America’s Mental Health Crisis

Salon (May 10) quoted Dr. Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the impact of the pandemic on mental health. “We have a pandemic right now, and that is going to lead us to have a mental health syndemic,” Mays said. “We have to think about what’s necessary to get us back to a place where we’re opening, we’re vaccinated, but that, in addition to those two things, we’re healthy mentally as well.” It also ran on Dame and Dnyuz, and her work was referenced on MDPI.

COVID-19: It’s ‘Very Possible’ we Will Continue Seasonal Mask-Wearing

Yahoo Finance (May 10) interviewed Dr. Kristen Choi, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of health policy and management, about the health benefits of wearing a mask. “We’ve all seen a lot of benefits to wearing masks, especially during the winter when we know there are a lot of viruses spreading around,” Choi said. “I’ve also heard people talking about potentially more acceptance of masks in health care, maybe even when you go to see the doctor.”

COVID-19: Bioscience Academics, Researchers, Industry and Investors to Converge at LABEST

Biospace (May 10) advanced the May 25-27 Los Angeles Bioscience Ecosystem Summit 2021, which will include keynote addresses from Dr. Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, as well as UCLA Health’s Dr. Eric Esrailian and athletics director Martin Jarmond. Rimoin’s address is entitled “COVID-19 and Beyond: How to Stop Pandemics Before They Start.” In addition, the Fielding School’s Thomas Priselac, adjunct professor of Health Policy and Management, and Dr. Andre Nel, Fielding School professor of environmental health sciences, are also slated to participate.

 

FEATURES (Other)

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (May 14) reported eight items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and staff experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included reports on a Los Angeles Times story quoting Dr. Julie Elginer, another Los Angeles Times story quoting Dr. Chandra Ford, a Scientific American opinion piece quoting Dr. Ninez Ponce, and a Reuters Health story quoting Dr. Michael Ong. Other items included advances on an upcoming conference on veteran’s health issues hosted by Dr. Kenneth Wells, and an upcoming keynote address by Dr. Anne Rimoin on preventing the next pandemic. The Letter also listed the publication of the latest book by Dr. Thomas Rice, and a UCLA Health piece quoting Dr. Gilbert Gee.

 

Chilean Constitution Could set new Gender Equality Standard

The Guardian (May 14) interviewed Aleta Sprague, a legal analyst with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's WORLD Policy Analysis Center, led by Dr. Jody Heymann, a UCLA distinguished professor of public health, public policy, and medicine, about prospects for increased gender equity being approved by a pending constitutional assembly in Chile. “At this moment, there’s a growing recognition of the full range of rights (necessary) to securing gender equality,” Sprague said, citing women’s bodily autonomy and freedom from violence as examples. It also ran on MSN.

Breaking Down Barriers to Care for Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

Let Life Happen (May 14) ran an article on data released by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center on barriers to metastatic breast cancer care. The work was led by CHPR’s AJ Scheitler, and co-authored by Dr. Ninez Ponce, and Dr. Beth Glenn, both Fielding School professors of health policy and management.

Five Reasons to Consider Chaga Mushrooms

The Healthy (May 13) Dr. Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about chaga mushrooms. “Chaga may also prevent blood from clotting, so if you are on blood thinners, you should not take this,” Hunnes said. “And if you are having any procedures done, you should not take it.” It also ran on MSN, and Hunnes was quoted on WTOP-FM (Washington, DC).

UCLA Fielding School Professor Honored for his work `Opening New Doors to Natural History’

LA Weekly (May 12) reported that Dr. Jared Diamond, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, will be honored at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum's 2021 "Dinosaur Ball" (virtual, Saturday night, May 15) for his work. Diamond is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author whose honors include the U.S. National Medal of Science, the Pulitzer Prize for Non-fiction, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Science, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. His work was also referenced in Salon, Atlas Obscura, the New York Times, the Tallahassee Democrat, ZME Science, and Business Daily Africa.

Opinion: Let’s Learn to Reject Ageism During Older Americans Month

Times of San Diego (May 12) cited research by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, led by Dr. Ninez Ponce, showing Native American culture stands out as a culture far more inclusive of older generations. It also ran on the San Diego Patch.

New Work Details Strengths and Weaknesses of the U.S. Health Insurance System

News Medical (May 12) quoted Dr. Thomas Rice, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health distinguished professor of health policy and management, about his new book, Health Insurance Systems: An International Comparison, published this week by the Academic Press. “The United States performed poorly overall in both equity and efficiency, compared with other wealthy nations, and at the same time, has a health insurance system that is substantially more costly than those in the other countries,” Rice said. “Moreover, the evidence is convincing that this appears to be causal; that is, it is the unique features of U.S. health insurance that are responsible for our country's poorer performance in health equity and efficiency.” Similar items were published by Science News and Clinique Amberieu (France).

UCLA report Provides Close Look at State’s Whole Person Care Pilot Health Program

State of Reform (May 11) quoted Dr. Nadereh Pourat, UCLA Fielding School professor of health policy and management and associate director at the Fielding School of Public Health's UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about a report on the state’s ‘Whole Person Care’ Pilot Health Program. “The data provide a roadmap for the creation of similar programs intended support low-income patients with high levels of unmet needs for nontraditional health services, such as care coordination,” Pourat said. “Many of the strategies used by Whole Person Care pilots were innovative and have succeeded in engaging those enrolled in their care and addressing their needs.” Also quoted was said Dr. Emmeline Chuang, Fielding School associate professor of health policy and management and a co-author of the brief: “Our goal is to provide data to bolster planning efforts for CalAIM, particularly those components such as Enhanced Care Management and In-Lieu of Services that seek to utilize a whole-person care approach to health,” Chuang said. “Under CalAIM, Medi-Cal–managed care plans will provide these services statewide, and lessons learned from WPC pilots will play an important role in ensuring the success of this initiative.” A similar item ran on Mirage News.