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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of November 1, 2020 - 12:00am

Week of: 
November 1, 2020 to November 7, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: U.S. Shattered Records for New Coronavirus Cases This Week as Hospitalizations Climbed

NPR (Nov. 6) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the second week in a row of record-breaking confirmed cases in the U.S. “There's no indication that the number of cases will go down,” Rimoin said. “These are true increases, it's not just due to more testing.” The interview ran widely on more than 50 NPR and affiliated stations across the U.S., including KPCC-FM (Los Angeles) and KPBS-FM (San Diego).

COVID-19: Cases are Ticking Back up in Los Angeles County and Across the Country

KPCC-FM (Nov. 5, starts at 27:10) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, on the flagship “Take Two” program about the increase in confirmed cases across the United States and in southern California. “Mortality rates, for example, in Latinos is three times higher than whites, and two times higher in African-Americans than whites,” Kim-Farley said. “This is an issue of systemic racism in the past and an issue of having to work and being in very crowded conditions.” Dr. Paul Simon, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and chief science officer and director of the Division of Assessment, Planning, and Quality at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, was also quoted.

COVID-19: Updating the Los Angeles Business Community on the Pandemic

KNX-AM (Nov. 5. starts at 9:55) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for an update on the pandemic with a focus on the business community and the economy. “We’re seeing patient (numbers) starting to rise again here in Los Angeles County,” Rimoin said. “We can expect the same thing that we’re seeing in Europe.”

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: How P.E. Teachers are Trying to get Students off the Couch During the Pandemic

Ed Source (Nov. 5) interviewed Susan Babey, a researcher at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about the impact of the pandemic on children and teen’s exercise needs during the pandemic. “These were already problems for many students, but the pandemic has exacerbated them,” Babey said. It ran widely, including in the Los Angeles Daily News, Santa Cruz Sentinel, and Monterey County Herald, among others.

COVID-19: Latinos who Consistently use Social Media are More Prone to Distress

Vida (Nov. 5, Spanish) quoted Ninez Ponce, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management and director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about a study that found Latinos in California suffer from severe psychological distress from continuous social media use. “With the unprecedented times we face as we grapple not only with the (COVID-19) pandemic but with racism as a public health crisis, we believe that actionable information (is) essential to reaching the creators of the policies so they can pass laws that support the health and well-being of Californians,” Ponce said.

COVID-19: “Trump Branded ‘Thabo Mbeki of America’ for Failed Leadership”

BizNews (Nov. 3, South Africa) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, comparing South Africa’s failed fight against AIDS under President Thabo Mbeki to the U.S. fight against COVID-19. “Mbeki surrounded himself with sycophants and cost his country hundreds of thousands of lives by ignoring science, and we’re suffering the same fate,” Rimoin said.

COVID-19: A Single Dose of Remdesivir Costs Uninsured two Months of Income

Louisiana Weekly (Nov. 2) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the inability of farmworkers and other low wage workers to pay for COVID-19-related treatment if they become ill. “To pay for just that one item, you would basically have to forgo all food, all housing, all clothing, and all transportation for two months,” Hayes-Bautista said. “Well, if you go without food, your average person dies in about 40 days.”

COVID-19: Europe Aims to Emerge Smarter From Latest Lockdowns

The Wall Street Journal (Nov. 1) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about decisions by multiple European countries’ governments to reinstate pandemic-containment regimes similar to those imposed in the spring to deal with a surge in infection across the continent. “Anything we can do to reduce contact between people is going to make a difference,” Rimoin said. “Right now, all we have are the blunt public-health measures that we’ve been using all along.”

 

FEATURES (Other)

Health Benefits of Beets

The Insider (Nov. 6) interviewed Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about the dietary benefits of beets. “Beets are rich in water content and fiber. This can help keep you fuller longer and better hydrated, which can also help with (feeling full),” Hunnes said. It also ran on MSN.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (Nov. 6) reported eight items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and staff experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included a Wall Street Journal interview of Prof. Anne Rimoin, a Reuters interview of Prof. Gerald Kominski, and a Los Angeles Times interview of Dr. Robert Kim-Farley. The Letter also listed two events, the Nov. 12 Innovate@UCLA 2020 Executive Leadership Awards event, with a presentation by Prof. Anne Rimoin, and a Nov. 17 presentation on the COVID-19 response in South Africa by Prof. Dvora Joseph Davey. Under “Member Research and Reports,” the Letter listed a Health Affairs study led by Prof. James Macinko and the annual California Health Interview Survey, led by Prof. Ninez Ponce. The final item, listed under “Faculty & Staff Honors,” reported a lifetime achievement award from the Association of Black Women Physicians (ABWP) recognizing Prof. Chandra Ford.

A Call for Scientists to Fight Health Inequity

HSPH News (Nov. 5) referenced Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, in a story about an event discussing poverty and racism in the United States.

UCLA-Led Research Team Finds That Working Women may Have Slower Memory Decline

KNBC-TV (Nov. 4, Los Angeles NBC affiliate) quoted Elizabeth Rose Mayeda, assistant professor of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about her study in the journal Neurology that found women who work in the paid labor force may have slower memory decline later in life than women who do not work for pay. “While there's no debate that managing a home and a family can be a complex and full-time job, our study suggests that engaging in paid work may offer some protection when it comes to memory loss,” Mayeda said. Co-authors include Robert Weiss, Fielding School professor of biostatistics, and Taylor Mobley, a senior research analyst at the Fielding School. Similar stories were run by KNSD-TV, KVEA-TV (Telemundo), KFI-AM, KEIB-AM, MyNewsLA, UPI, the Times of San Diego, HealthDay, HealthNews Digest, Science News, MedPage Today, Medically Prime, Physicians’s Weekly, Drugs.com, and MedicalXPress, among others.

Women who Never Work After Starting a Family Have 50% Worse Memory Decline, Study Finds

The Daily Mail (Nov. 4, United Kingdom) quoted Elizabeth Rose Mayeda, assistant professor of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about her study in the journal Neurology that found having a paid job keeps women's memory sharp as they get older. “Memory decline can be an early sign of Alzheimer's dementia, and more women than men live with Alzheimer's dementia,” Mayeda said. “Policies that help women with children participate in the workforce may be an effective strategy to prevent memory decline in women.” Co-authors include Robert Weiss, Fielding School professor of biostatistics, and Taylor Mobley, a senior research analyst at the Fielding School. The story also ran in the MailonSunday.

More Americans on Diets Today Than a Decade ago, CDC Report Finds

The Associated Press (Nov. 3) interviewed Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that found 17% of Americans said they were on diets during the 2017-2018 survey period, up from 14% a decade earlier. The article ran in almost 100 outlets, including ABC News, the Los Angeles Times, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Opinion: The 5-year Anniversary of the Aliso Canyon Natural gas Leak – A Reflective Review

The Los Angeles Daily News (Nov. 3) published a commentary by Michael Jerrett, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, and Diane Garcia-Gonzales, a researcher with the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Healthy Climate Solutions, about the aftermath of the Aliso Canyon natural gas leak in Los Angeles. “Five years post-blowout, the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility continues to inject, store, and withdraw billions of cubic feet of methane, and we still do not understand the range of emissions or full range of potential health effects to those living downwind,” they wrote. “While the state slowly crawls over the bridge towards renewables, we must ensure the transitions occurs equitably and that communities do not bear unfair burdens as we move closer to a renewable energy future.”

United States is Falling Behind in the Health Care of Older Population, Study Shows

MyNewsLA (Nov. 3) quoted James Macinko, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor in the departments of Community Health Sciences and Health Policy and Management, about his Health Affairs study that found the U.S. is behind other wealthy nations in caring for those 50 and older. “In the highest-performing health systems such as those of the richer countries of Western Europe, older adults almost all were able to consult a doctor, at least annually, without incurring high out of pocket expenses,” Macinko said. “That is not as common an outcome in the U.S.” Similar items ran in News Medical, Health News Digest, Science News, Medical Observer, and YubaNet, among others.

Opinion: How shocking will a Donald Trump victory be?
The Economic Times (Nov. 3, India) published a commentary by Sudipto Banerjee, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics, on the U.S. presidential election. “While a Trump victory will be surprising, much more so than four years ago in 2016 when his odds of winning on the morning of election day were three times higher than today, statisticians will be quick to point out that events carrying probabilities such as these are, in fact, not that uncommon,” Banerjee wrote. “Poker players will recognize that Trump’s chances are about 50 times higher than holding a flush. In fact, one sees many instances of random events that are much more improbable than a Trump victory.”

California’s Health Care Ambitions Rely on Biden win

California Healthline (Nov. 2) referenced the Oct. 21 Paul Torrens Health Forum, moderated by Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management. The program featured two health policy experts, Lanhee Chen of the Hoover Institution of Stanford University and Mark Peterson, professor of public policy, political science and law at UCLA, who were both quoted in the story. It ran on more than 30 other outlets, including Kaiser Health News and Health Leaders.

SCAN Group and SCAN Health Plan: Dr. Linda Rosenstock Elected Board Chair

Yahoo (Nov. 2) reported that Dr. Linda Rosenstock, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean emeritus and professor of health policy and management, has been elected as the new board chair for SCAN Group, whose holdings include SCAN Health Plan, one of the nation's largest not-for-profit Medicare Advantage plans. “Linda Rosenstock is committed both to public health and to addressing the social determinants of health that can play an outsize role in affecting outcomes,” said Dr. Sachin H. Jain, president and CEO of SCAN Group. “I'm confident she'll provide SCAN with guidance and leadership as we seek out new and innovative partnerships not just to address illness, but to keep seniors healthy as they age.”

Bidencare or Trumpcare? Health Plans Will Affect the U.S. Economy Differently

Reuters (Nov. 1) interviewed Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about research that indicates when uninsured Americans get sick, they get care in expensive settings like the emergency room, which strains the finances of hospitals that provide their care and leaves taxpayers footing the bill. It ran in more than 50 outlets, including U.S. News & World Report and The Guardian.

Diabetic Amputations a ‘Shameful Metric’ of Inadequate Care

The Philadelphia Tribune (Nov. 1) quoted Ninez Ponce, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about diabetic amputations. “It’s the most shameful metric we have on quality of care,” Ponce said. “It is a health equity issue. We are a very rich state. We shouldn’t be seeing these diabetic amputations.”