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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of November 8, 2020 - 12:00am

Week of: 
November 8, 2020 to November 14, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: California Passes one Million Cases

The BBC (Nov. 14) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the state of the pandemic in California, which saw 1 million confirmed cases this week. “We’re seeing an incredible rise in cases throughout the state,” Rimoin said. “This is not a minor illness … we don’t really know what this virus does to the body.”

COVID-19: The Pandemic Surge and Travel Advisories

KNX-AM (Nov. 14, begins at 02:25) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for the flagship “In Depth” program about the pandemic. “We are already seeing a surge in cases in southern California, California, and nationally, and we can all predict where this is going to go,” Rimoin said. “The bottom line is we all really need to do our best to wear a mask, social distance, hand hygiene, avoid crowds, and avoid those family gatherings … Ten percent of people who tested positive last week indicated that they had been in gathering of 10 people or more; we know those gatherings are dangerous.”

COVID-19: Face Coverings are Really Effective at Reducing Spread

KNX-AM (Nov. 13) interviewed Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs, about her study in Aerosol Science and Technology that found even a simple cloth mask provides significant protections against COVID-19 transmission, significantly reducing the spread of respiratory droplets. “It was a surprise to us when we start experiments, we expect a relatively low-efficiency,” Zhu said. “Even a single cloth mask can reduce cough particles by 77 percent that is rather to someone not wearing a mask at all.”

COVID-19: Tents, Igloos and Barriers, Here's How the Virus can Spread From Table-to-Table

ABC News (Nov. 13) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, for the “Good Morning America” program on the risks of dining outside. “Outdoors means no walls, no ceiling,” Rimoin said. “When I see these tents consists of walls, (they) don’t have the ventilation the way an indoor restaurant would.”

COVID-19: How to Have a Safe Thanksgiving

KTLA-TV (Nov. 13) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the surge in infections and how to have a safe Thanksgiving. “What we’re seeing is a 40% rise in hospitalizations, a 25% rise in cases, and we’re back to a point of escalating cases throughout southern California,” Rimoin said. “Cases are really linked very closely to family gatherings … we really need to avoid these gatherings and stay apart right now.”

COVID-19: The Pandemic is Entering a Dangerous new Chapter

NPR (Nov. 13) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the surge in infections across the United States. “This is a hard moment where we don't necessarily get to have our cake and eat it too,” Rimoin said. “You want to have bars open, then you might not be able to have schools open. You want to not wear a mask; you're going to see more COVID.” The story ran on more than 25 NPR affiliates across the U.S.

COVID-19: Quarantine now Before Seeing Select Family Members this Thanksgiving

KTTV-TV (Nov. 12, Fox affiliate, Los Angeles) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about how to safely celebrate the holidays. “The best thing you can do is to start quarantining right now because right now, marks two weeks before Thanksgiving. There's a 2 to 14 day window where you may show symptoms after being exposed,” Rimoin said. “We know this virus has been transmitted through events just like a Thanksgiving dinner. In fact, last week alone, 10% of the COVID positive cases that were reported in LA County had been to a gathering of ten people or more.”

COVID-19: Ticketmaster to Verify Vaccination Status of Fans Before Issuing Concert Passes

KCBS-TV (Nov. 12, CBS affiliate, Los Angeles) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about a proposal that concert-goers verify their vaccination status or prove they have tested negative for coronavirus within 72 hours prior to the show. “The test you have today doesn’t mean that you can’t be exposed and then also become infected after that time,” Rimoin said. “I really implore people; just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should do it.”

COVID-19: U.S. Cases Are Growing At Record Speed

NPR (Nov. 12) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, on the surge in infections across the United States, and how best to fight it. “Every action has a reaction here,” Rimoin said. “I don't think that we necessarily have to go into a lockdown. It doesn't have to be an either/or choice.” The story ran on more than 15 NPR affiliates across the U.S.

COVID-19: Face Shields Alone Provide Little Protection From Coronavirus Particles, UCLA Study Finds

KABC-TV (Nov. 12, ABC affiliate, Los Angeles) quoted Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs, about her study in Aerosol Science and Technology that found even a simple cloth mask provides significant protections against COVID-19 transmission, significantly reducing the spread of respiratory droplets. “We found that a simple cough could send particles more than six feet away, without face coverings,” Zhu said. Fielding School scholar Liqiao Li, a co-author of the study, was also quoted.

COVID-19: Simple Cloth Masks Provide Significant Protection Against Transmission

KMEX-TV (Nov. 12, Univision affiliate in Los Angeles, Spanish) interviewed Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs, about her study in Aerosol Science and Technology that found even a simple cloth mask provides significant protections against COVID-19 transmission, significantly reducing the spread of respiratory droplets.

COVID-19: United States Hospitalizations Reaching Record Highs

The BBC (Nov. 11) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the state of the pandemic in the United States. “We’re hearing reports all over the United States right now of surges of cases and hospitals now becoming overrun,” Rimoin said. “Once we see this increase in cases, we see the inevitable rise in hospitalizations, ICU beds being filled, and the overwhelming of staff and resources … it’s going to very difficult to stop this trend.”

COVID-19: UCLA-led Research Offers Strategies to Control Pandemic With Fewer Restrictions on Economy

KNBC-TV (Nov. 11, NBC affiliate, Los Angeles) interviewed Dr. Akihiro Nishi, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of epidemiology, about his study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that found suggest strategies for sustaining economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic while avoiding spread of infection. “Although lockdown and safer at home policies have been shown to be effective in lowering the number of cases and deaths due to COVID-19, governments in many countries are confronted by significant political, economic and social pressure to reopen their economies,” Nishi said. “This research provides a basis for real-world policies that -- if strictly managed and maintained -- could accomplish that goal, while keeping people as safe as possible.” Similar stories ran on KFI-AM, MyNewsLA, Health News Digest, City News Service, Times of San Diego, Science News, Asian News International, Businessworld, Zee Kannada, New Kerala, LatestLy, Sify News, and Mirage News.

COVID-19: Simple Cloth Masks Provide Significant Protection Against Transmission

KTTV-TV (Nov. 11, Fox affiliate, Los Angeles) quoted Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs, about her study in Aerosol Science and Technology that found even a simple cloth mask provides significant protections against COVID-19 transmission, significantly reducing the spread of respiratory droplets. “This is a no brainer(but) I think people want to see the data, the evidence, rather than me just saying we know the mask will help,” Zhu said. “The take home message is masks help.” UCLA scholars Liqiao Li and Muchuan Niu, Zhu’s co-authors, were also referenced. Similar stories ran on KNBC-TV, KEIB-AM, KFI-AM, KRRL-FM, MyNewsLA, Health News Digest, News Medical, HealthCare Purchasing, City News Service, the Los Angeles Patch, Our Weekly, the Times of San Diego, the Antelope Valley Times, and Science News.

COVID-19: Simple Cloth Masks Provide Significant Protection Against Transmission

Annenberg Media (Nov. 11, USC, starts at 2:17) interviewed Yifang Zhu, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs, about her study in Aerosol Science and Technology that found even a simple cloth mask provides significant protections against COVID-19 transmission, significantly reducing the spread of respiratory droplets. “It’s the simplest thing the public can do, not just to protect themselves but to protect the community, protect their loved ones, and protect the people around them,” Zhu said. “Everybody needs to do their part and together we can stop and slow down the spread.”

COVID-19: Some California Counties Pushed Back to More Restrictive Tiers

KTTV-TV (Nov. 10, Fox affiliate, Los Angeles) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the state of the pandemic in California. “People are tired. I completely understand, but we really have to do the hard work right now,” Rimoin said. “We know there's good news about potential vaccines but that's not happening in the near future so all we have are these blunt health measures to follow. We can avoid shutting things down if we do the right thing now, but it only gets harder as cases start to mount.”

COVID-19: How to Travel Safely This Holiday Season

CNBC (Nov. 10) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about how travelers can assess the risks of flying. “(It) is more than just sitting on a plane; you have to go through (security), wait in seating areas and lines to board, and use public bathrooms,” Rimoin said. “You also cannot control who you sit next to, which also dictates your risk.” It also ran on MSN.

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: A Notre Dame Celebration was Reckless, but can it Teach us About Pandemic Spread?

The Los Angeles Times (Nov. 14) interviewed Dr. David Eisenman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about the risks of infection at college sporting events, using Notre Dame’s improbable comeback against top-ranked Clemson Nov. 7 that ended in a victory for the Irish in double overtime and thousands of students swarming onto the gridiron. “All those people crowded together, cheering and yelling … it made me nervous, for sure,” Eisenman said. “If you see a huge spike that tells you something. If you don’t, that tells you something else.”

COVID-19: Should I Get a Test?

The Wall Street Journal (Nov. 13) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about when an individual should get a test for COVID-19. “If you are driving by car to a vacation in the mountains, you probably don’t need to be tested, but you might want to consider it if you flew on an airplane,” Kim-Farley said.

COVID-19: Biden Aide Sees Local Measures, not National Lockdown, to Fight Pandemic

Reuters(Nov. 13) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the Biden Administration’s plans for dealing with the pandemic. “This holiday season is a very critical one for us and we just have to realize that it cannot be business as usual,” Kim-Farley said.

COVID-19: It Started with one Sick Woman in San Jose. Now, 1 Million Californians Have COVID-19

The Los Angeles Times (Nov. 13) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about how challenging it is for states to try to control a pandemic without an overarching federal response. “It’s very difficult to try to protect a state within a federal system; we don’t have the levers available to us,” Brewer said. “California has managed to slow things down relative to other places, but we can’t do it alone.”

COVID-19: Trump Thought Downplaying the Pandemic Would Help the Economy. Biden is Betting the Opposite

The Los Angeles Times (Nov. 12) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about contrasts between President-elect Biden’s approach to the pandemic, and that of the Trump Administration. “The Trump administration has not ever excelled in policy and behavior that results in reduction of COVID-19 cases,” Rimoin said. “What the Biden team could do right this minute is start talking to state leaders, experts, community leaders and get their plan in place so they are ready to roll as soon as it’s possible.”

COVID-19: Thinking About Having a Holiday Gathering This Year?

Refinery29 (Nov. 12) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about how to celebrate the holidays safely. “There’s no zero-risk scenario here,” Rimoin said. “Everybody has to keep in mind that these holidays are not going to be like others. We all need to be very cautious because we have rising cases, and we have the potential for exponential spread throughout this country, and that means a lot of unnecessary illness, a lot of unnecessary severe illness, and unnecessary death.” It also ran on MSN and Yahoo.

COVID-19: Midwest Hospitals Scramble to Keep up

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune (Nov. 11) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the state of the pandemic response in Minnesota and the Midwestern U.S. “You're in the middle of the cyclone,” Brewer said. “The critical issue right now is the very rapid growth in number of cases and case rates, and the associated, though slower, rise in deaths.”

COVID-19: Evictions Would Raise Risks for Everyone

Livescience (Nov. 10) interviewed Kathryn Leifheit, a scholar at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about research that suggest widespread evictions during the pandemic increases the risks of further spread. "Across a wide set of scenarios, the researchers found that evictions could lead to significant increases in COVID-19 infections in U.S. cities," said Leifheit, who was not involved in the study. Hilary Godwin, a former FSPH faculty member and associate dean, was also quoted. It also ran on MSN.

COVID-19: U.S. is Behind on Vaccine Messaging

USA Today (Nov. 10) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, and Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, on the need for an extensive public health communications plan about any potential COVID-19 vaccine. “The CDC should be leading the charge and coordinating, as they always have in the past," Rimoin said. "Instead, what’s happened is most people are getting their public health messages from CNN and MSNBC.” The story ran in more than 50 other outlets, including the Palm Springs Desert Sun and Arizona Republic.

COVID-19: The Virus may Overwhelm Hospitals in Some Areas Before Biden Takes Office

The Washington Post (Nov. 10) quoted Dr. David Eisenman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about the risks of the current upsurge in confirmed cases of COVID-19. “Going into Thanksgiving people are going to start to see family and get together indoors,” Eisenman said. “Then the cases will spread from that and then five weeks later we have another set of holidays and people will gather then and by January, we will be exploding with cases.”

COVID-19: Pasadena City Epidemiologist Honored

Pasadena Now (Nov. 9) reported that Matt Feaster, a UCLA Fielding School of Public Health alum (PhD, ‘19), was recognized for his contributions to the battle against COVID-19 pandemic by the California Association of Communicable Disease Controllers (CACDC). A similar story ran in the Pasadena Star-News.

COVID-19: Disproportionately Affecting Farmworkers in California

Ms. magazine (Nov. 9) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the impact of the pandemic on California’s farmworkers and their families. “We have seen COVID just ripping through the meatpacking plants here in California because of the nature of the occupation,” Hayes-Bautista said. “And it just so happens that in California, these occupations are almost entirely filled by Latinos, almost entirely by immigrants, and a very high percentage of undocumented people, anywhere from 40 to 80 percent, are the estimates.”

COVID-19: How Safe Are Fitness Classes?

New York magazine (Nov. 9) interviewed Dr. Peter Katona, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about risks in attending fitness classes during the pandemic. “How much you do indoors and how safe it is indoors is going to depend, to a large degree, on how much virus is out there in your community,” Katona said. “If you’re outdoors, you’ve got sunlight, you’ve got temperature, you’ve got air currents — you’ve got all these things working in your favor.”

COVID-19: Pandemic Could Overwhelm U.S. Health System Before Biden Takes Office

Politico (Nov. 9) interviewed Dr. David Eisenman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about the risks of the current upsurge in confirmed cases of COVID-19, including nearly 1,100 deaths on Nov. 7 alone. “That’s three jetliners full of people crashing and dying,” Eisenman said. “And we will do that every day and then it will get more and more.” It also ran on Yahoo Finance.

COVID-19: Coronavirus Today – A Glimmer of Hope

The Los Angeles Times (Nov. 9) quoted Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the pace of increase in confirmed cases in California. “We are fortunate in the sense that we have a much more muted uptick that’s beginning to occur,” Kim-Farley said. “And I think it’s because we are still adhering, for the most part, to this tiered approach of gradual opening of the economy and schools.” The story also ran in the Napa Valley Register.

COVID-19: Coronavirus Again Stalking California, but There is Still Time to Prevent a Third Wave

The Los Angeles Times (Nov. 8) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the pace of increase in confirmed cases in California. “We are fortunate in the sense that we have a much more muted uptick that’s beginning to occur,” Kim-Farley said. “And I think it’s because we are still adhering, for the most part, to this tiered approach of gradual opening of the economy and schools.” Dr. Paul Simon, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and chief science officer and director of the Division of Assessment, Planning, and Quality at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, was also quoted. The story ran widely, including in MSN, the Bakersfield Californian, Sina Daily News (Chinese), KTLA-TV, and KSRO-FM among others.

COVID-19: How to Safely Form a 'Social Bubble' This Winter

Business Insider (Nov. 8) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the concept of “social bubbles,” small groups that only see each other, to protect against contagion. “You have to remember that there are no zero-risk scenarios and most people's bubbles are bigger than they think they are,” Rimoin said. “You will need to trust the people you are 'bubbling' with and that everyone will be honest and open about any exposures that they have had — or that the people around them have had.” It also ran on Yahoo News and Science Alert.

 

FEATURES (Other)

UCLA: Despite Spending Most on Health Care, U.S. Lags In Life Expectancy

KPBS-TV (Nov. 13, PBS affiliate, San Diego) quoted Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor of health policy and management, about research he contributed to in the American Journal of Public Health that found the United States is lagging behind other wealthy countries in life expectancy despite spending the most money on health care. “Considering what we get — life expectancy for the dollars spent — do we spend the money in the right places?” Fielding asked. “The answer is no. We spend more, get less and waste more than every other wealthy country in the world, and administrative costs, fraud and excessive prices do not add anything to a better life.” Study co-author Dr. Steven Teutsch, FSPH professor of health policy and management, was also quoted. “Good public health and population health approaches and strategies can add more years of life than can medical care, and every wasted dollar in health care is one less dollar for public health, schools, jobs, housing and parks,” Teutsch said. Similar stories ran on KNBC-TV (NBC affiliate, Los Angeles), City News Service, and in the Antelope Valley Times.

UCLA: Despite Spending Most on Health Care, U.S. Lags in Life Expectancy

KNX-AM (Nov. 13; begins at 6:17 pm) interviewed Dr. Steven Teutsch, FSPH professor of health policy and management, about research he contributed to in the American Journal of Public Health that found the United States is lagging behind other wealthy countries in life expectancy despite spending the most money on health care. “We’re talking about housing, education, and other kinds of social programs,” Teutsch said. “You look at the total of medical care and social spending; we spend about two-thirds of ours on medical care whereas in other countries it’s about two-thirds on these other programs.”

Golden State Warriors Submit Plan for Home-Game Coronavirus Testing to Allow 50% fan Capacity

ESPN (Nov. 13) interviewed UCLA Fielding School of Public Health alum Joe Lacob (MPH) and owner of the NBA’s Golden States Warriors, about a plan to spend $30 million or more on testing fans in order to re-open Chase Center, the team’s arena, at 50% capacity for home games in the upcoming season. “I not only want to get this done and show the world how we can do it now, I’m willing to spend the money to do it,” Lacob aid. “This is a serious, serious problem. It cannot go on for multiple years … because if this were to go on for several years, the NBA is no more.”

Can Exercise Serve as an Antidote to Health Disparities?

The California Health Report (Nov. 13) referenced research by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health found that less than a third of children ages 5 to 11, engaged in at least an hour of physical activity every day, as recommended by public health guidelines.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (Nov. 13) reported four items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and staff experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included reporting research by Elizabeth Rose Mayeda and Robert Weiss, published in Neurology, under “Member Research and Reports,” and the Nov. 23 CGIH presentation by Dvora Joseph-Davey, under “Events.” Under “Members in the News,” the Letter listed a Politico interview of Dr. David Eisenman, and an NPR interview of Anne Rimoin.

Minorities who Attempt Suicide are Discharged Differently Than Whites

Reuters (Nov. 12) interviewed Vickie Mays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about research that suggests minorities admitted for attempted suicide or self-inflicted injury in the U.S. may be less likely to be discharged to psychiatric or rehabilitative care. “Because there's such a lack of mental-health services that are accessible and affordable and available, (racial and ethnic minorities) often end up getting services through . . . the criminal-justice system,” said Mays, who was not involved in the study. It also ran on MDAlert and Medscape.

People on the Move: Dr. Linda Rosenstock, SCAN Health Plan

Modern Healthcare (Nov. 12) reported that Dr. Linda Rosenstock, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean emeritus and professor of health policy and management, has been elected the new board chair for SCAN Group, whose holdings include SCAN Health Plan, one of the nation's largest not-for-profit Medicare Advantage plans.

Association of Black Women Physicians Honors UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Professor

The Los Angeles Sentinel (Nov. 12) reported that the Association of Black Women Physicians selected Chandra Ford, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, for the organization’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Ophthalmic Immune-Related Adverse Events Following Anti-CTLA-4 or PD-1 Therapy

Physician’s Weekly (Nov. 12) reported findings by Anne Coleman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and professor of ophthalmology, UCLA Stein Eye Institute, about ophthalmic related events and cancer immunotherapy. “Early coordination with ophthalmic subspecialist care is important, as rates (are) elevated,” the authors wrote. “Patients with a previous history of any uveitis or autoimmune ocular disease are at high risk.”

Even the Healthiest Shellfish are Literal Garbage Monsters

MEL (Nov. 12) interviewed Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about the healthiness of shellfish. “Plastic — an ever-more pervasive threat — is harmful to marine-animals’ health; and our own,” Hunnes said. “I don’t really feel comfortable ranking them, because I feel quite strongly that people shouldn’t be eating them.”

Women who Work for pay Have Slower Memory Loss as They age, Study Finds

NBC’s Today (Nov. 11) quoted Elizabeth Rose Mayeda, assistant professor of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about her study in the journal Neurology that found having a paid job keeps women's memory sharp as they get older. “While there’s no debate that managing a home and a family can be a complex and full-time job,” Mayeda said, it’s paid work that seems to protect from memory loss. Similar stories ran on MSN Italia and Being Patient.

SCAN Welcomes Rosenstock

California Broker (Nov. 11) reported that Dr. Linda Rosenstock, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health dean emeritus and professor of health policy and management, has been elected as the new board chair for SCAN Group, whose holdings include SCAN Health Plan, one of the nation's largest not-for-profit Medicare Advantage plans.

Presbyopia Device Fails to Win Over FDA Panel

MedPage Today (Nov. 10) referenced Ron Hays, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, in a report on a medical device’s review by the U.S. FDA’s Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. Hays was one of 15 members of the panel who voted against approval, on a 15-1 vote.

What’s at Stake for California if the ACA is Overturned

CalMatters (Nov. 10) interviewed Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the potential impact of today’s Supreme Court case on the Affordable Care Act and its potential $25 billion impact on California. “If the court keeps the law intact, one of (President-elect Joe) Biden’s platforms was expanding the ACA, or what we call ACA 2.0, so he’d try to take it even further,” Kominski said.

What It’s Like to be an Uninsured Mom in 2020

SheKnows (Nov. 10) interviewed Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the impact of today’s Supreme Court case on the Affordable Care Act on parents who would otherwise be without health insurance “Being uninsured with children, even if the child is eligible for Medicaid, is very stressful for low-income parents,” Kominski said. “At a minimum, it means that moms most likely have to seek care from different clinics where they can get treated even if uninsured.” It also ran on MSN.

California Could Lose Billions if the Affordable Care Act Is Overturned

LAist (Nov. 10) interviewed Steven P. Wallace, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and associate director of FSPH’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about today’s Supreme Court challenge to the Affordable Care Act. “If (the ACA) is invalidated, the federal support for California’s (Medi-Cal) expansion would disappear,” Wallace said. The state could pay for expansion but it would have to pay for 100% versus like 10%.”

What Will a Biden Presidency Mean for California?

The San Jose Mercury News (Nov. 9) interviewed Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the impact of the Biden presidency on federal funding for health care and the pandemic response. “A lot of it is leadership and modeling,” Kominski said, “a cease and desist on the constant assault on science.” It also ran in the other three publications of the Bay Area News Group (East Bay Times, Marin Independent Journal, and SiliconValley.com) and XX publications in the Southern California News Group (Los Angeles Daily News, .

California Braces for Supreme Court Arguments on Affordable Care Act

NPR (Nov. 9) interviewed Steven P. Wallace, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and associate director of FSPH’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about today’s Supreme Court challenge to the Affordable Care Act and its potential $25 billion impact on California. “The state could pay for an expansion, but it would have to pay 100% vs. like 10%,” Wallace said.

UCLA FSPH Research Cited in Report on California Pediatricians

The San Joaquin Valley Sun (Nov. 9) covered a story on a doctor training others on pediatric infectious disease and cited data from a UCLA Center for Health Policy Research policy note on the number of pediatric specialists in California.