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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of October 25, 2020 - 12:00am

Week of: 
October 25, 2020 to October 31, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: California’s Latinos Grapple With Extraordinary Grief

Capradio (Oct. 29, KXJZ-FM, Sacramento NPR affiliate) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on Latinos, including grief and stress. “Someone will pass their last few hours, isolated, intubated and maybe using Facetime to say goodbye … that is very, very difficult,” Hayes-Bautista said. “It is what we allow to happen as a society, (and) I think is very, very sad.”

COVID-19: Race for a Vaccine

KTTV-TV (Oct. 29) interviewed Dr. Keith Norris, executive board member of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, about the phase three trials of a COVID-19 vaccine. “We are excited to be part of the study here at UCLA,” Norris said. “We’re hoping to recruit as many as 250 individuals in the Los Angeles area to participate in and try and get the information we know about how effective and how safely these vaccines are.”

COVID-19: UCLA Health Experts say Latinos hit Hard Because Many are Essential Workers, Left Unprotected

KABC-TV (Oct. 28) interviewed David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on Latinos. “Facts tell different stories, depending on who is picking them, and placing them in a narrative line," Hayes-Bautista said. “This was happening around the country. the transportation drivers, metro drivers, bus drivers, the workers who cleaned the offices, the nursing home attendant.” It also ran on KGTV-TV (ABC affiliate, San Diego).

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: Halloween a Do-or-die Moment in California’s Fight

The Los Angeles Times (Oct. 31) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the risks of infection and spread because of the Halloween holiday. “Treat yourself and your family to a safe Halloween. Don’t trick the community to even higher levels of spread,” Kim-Farley said. “We do not want to see one event foster increased transmission that is then amplified in the next event, then further amplified in the next event.”

COVID-19: Under a Blue Moon, Officials Hope for a Quiet, and Distanced, Halloween

The Solano County (CA) Daily Republic (Oct. 31) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the risks of infection and spread because of the Halloween holiday. “Treat yourself and your family to a safe Halloween. Don’t trick the community to even higher levels of spread,” Kim-Farley said.

COVID-19: Falling Through the Cracks

India Currents (Oct. 31) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on Californian’s farmworkers. “How would they pay to see a doctor? Some do not even know any doctors,” Hayes-Bautista said. “You could wind up paying $100 to almost $2000 for one test (and) in a farm worker family that quickly adds up.”

COVID-19: Why are Cases Soaring in the Midwest?

The Huffington Post (Oct. 30) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the COVID-19 surge in the U.S. Midwest, where hospitalizations reached the highest levels yet this week in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri and Ohio. “Virus transmission dynamics are pretty clear at this point,” Rimoin said. “We know that indoor gatherings with individuals from multiple households where people are unable to social distance and are not wearing masks are risky.” It also ran on Yahoo and AOL.

COVID-19: Opinion: A Counterintuitive Reason to Feel Confident About a Vaccine

CalMatters (Oct. 30) published a commentary co-authored by Kristen Choi, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health assistant professor of health policy and management, about ways to promote confidence in the vaccine. “The risks that COVID-19 poses on one’s health are far greater than those of the vaccine,” the authors wrote. “The American public needs more reasons to feel confident about getting the vaccine.” The piece also ran in the Palm Springs (CA) Desert Sun.

COVID-19: Coronavirus Today - ‘Normality’ in 2022?

The Los Angeles Times (Oct. 29) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the decision by Dodger ballplayer Justin Turner, who had tested positive for COVIOD, to join his teammates on the field after Tuesday’s World Series clincher. “Instead, he put a lot of people around him at risk,” Rimoin said. “And now he’s an example to a lot of people: ‘If Justin Turner can do it, why can’t I?’ And that’s a real problem.”

COVID-19: Pandemic pushes the U.S. health system to its limit

El Pais (Oct. 29, Spain) interviewed Arturo Vargas Bustamante, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of health policy and management, on the U.S. health care system’s response to the pandemic. “People are avoiding going to hospitals so as not to get infected and so that they do not receive a bill, and with good reason," Vargas Bustamante said. It ran in Spanish in multiple outlets and also ran – translated into Portuguese – in Tribuna Uniao (Brazil).

COVID-19: Is it Safe to Host Thanksgiving Dinner During the Pandemic?

The Huffington Post (Oct. 29) interviewed Pamina Gorbach, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, on strategies to minimize the risk of spreading the coronavirus during the holidays. “This is not the year to have a traditional Thanksgiving dinner,” Gorbach said. “We don’t want big family dinners to turn into superspreader events.”

COVID-19: Act of Selfishness Leaves Stain on Dodgers’ Championship Moment

The Los Angeles Times (Oct. 28) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, for a piece by columnist Bill Plaschke on the decision by ballplayer Justin Turner, who had tested positive for COVIOD, to join his teammates on the field after Tuesday’s World Series clincher. “We are the champions … we’re just not the most responsible champions,” Rimoin said. “Leaving isolation to go back on the field, that shows you how much human beings struggle to do the right thing … he really didn’t do the right thing here. At the end of the day, he let his fans down.” It also ran on MSN, Yahoo, the Bakersfield Californian, and the Solano (CA) Daily Republic.

COVID-19: As Dodgers and Lakers win, Spread at Celebrations Alarm Health Officials

The Los Angeles Times (Oct. 27) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about the risks of infection at events in southern California, where young adults are driving the spread of the highly contagious disease. The story also ran on MSN and the Bakersfield Californian.

COVID-19: Will the Pandemic Finally Inspire Paid Sick Leave for all Workers?

MEL (Oct. 27) quoted Dr. Jody Heymann, founding director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s WORLD Policy Analysis Center and a UCLA distinguished professor of public health, public policy, and medicine, in a column about the need for paid sick leave in the United States to fight the pandemic. “Paid sick leave is the only way all workers in America can afford to stay home when they are sick and not spread the novel coronavirus to others,” Heymann said. “Yet, in a report released May 14th, the Federal Reserve found that one in five workers still had no paid sick leave in April as the pandemic raged.”

COVID-19: Other States are Watching Rates Rise; California’s are Steady

The Sacramento Bee (Oct. 26) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, about how California has largely avoided a new wave of coronavirus cases that have surged elsewhere in the U.S. The story also ran in the Fresno Bee, Modesto Bee, and the Solano County (CA) Daily Republic.

COVID-19: Company Tied to Top HHS Official Landed $470 Million Deal for Pandemic Preparedness

The Daily Beast (Oct. 26) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about whether the “revolving door” from the private sector to public service has played an improper role in U.S. government decision-making related to the pandemic. “Having been in industry is not a disqualification but is certainly something that you need to think about when appointing people to these positions,” Brewer said. The story also ran on Yahoo and MSN.

COVID-19: Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show Goes Forward

The Triton (Oct. 26) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the risks of infection being spread through entertainment venues. “Just because we don’t have ample evidence of it happening — yet — doesn’t mean it’s not happening,” Rimoin said. “There is simply no zero-risk scenario here. When you create opportunities for large numbers of people to come together, you are providing opportunities for the virus to spread.”

COVID-19: Farmworkers at Risk due to Failure to pay for Treatments

La Opinion (Oct. 25) quoted David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the inability of California’s farmworkers and other low wage workers to pay for COVID-19-related treatment if they become ill. “What our president received for free - treatments, doctors, hospital and plane - when he fell ill with COVID is out of reach of the farm worker families who feed us every day,” Hayes-Bautista said.

 

FEATURES (Other)

Big Spenders Betting Money Talks on Health-Care Ballot Issues

Bloomberg (Oct. 30) interviewed Arturo Vargas Bustamante, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health associate professor of health policy and management, on ballot initiatives where voters are being asked to add taxes on vaping, mandate that doctors always be on site when dialysis centers are open, and approve $5.5 billion in bonds for the sole stem cell research funding agency in the country. “Essentially, people are more interested in health-care initiatives,” Vargas Bustamante said.

Survey Says 10 Million Eligible California Voters Don't Vote or Sometimes Vote

City News Service (Oct. 30) reported on the annual release of the California Health Interview Survey, produced by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, led by Ninez Ponce, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management. The study found that 10 million eligible California voters either don't vote or only sometimes vote. The piece was picked up by KNBC-TV/NBC Los Angeles, KABC-TV/ABC 7, KFI-AM, MyNewsLA, and other outlets.

Opinion: On Women’s Rights, the U.S. is far From “Number One”

Ms. magazine (Oct. 30) referenced research by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s WORLD Policy Analysis Center, led by Dr. Jody Heymann, founding director of the center and a UCLA distinguished professor of public health, public policy, and medicine, regarding gender equality, equal rights, and the 2020 election.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (Oct. 30) reported seven items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and staff experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included an item about the Association of Pacific Rim Universities’ webinar at UCLA hosted by Dean Ron Brookmeyer, and including Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, Dr. Timothy F. Brewer, Prof. Yifang Zhu, and Dr. Zunyou Wu. Others included a Nov. 5 webinar sponsored by the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, led by Prof. Michael Jerrett and the Nov. 12 deadline for the “Healthcare Management Case Competition,” sponsored by the UCLA Center for Healthcare Management, led by Prof. Laura Erskine, both under “Events.” The Friday Letter also listed a New York Times interview of Prof. Anne Rimoin; a Guardian interview of Dr. Beate Ritz; an item about Prof. Ninez Ponce and Prof. Thomas Rice being named to an editorial board; and Prof. Vickie Mays receiving an award at the APHA 20202 conference.

App-Based Companies Pushing Prop. 22 say Drivers Will get Health Benefits. Will They?

LAist (Oct. 29) quoted Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the impact on health care of California’s Proposition 22, which would keep drivers classified as independent contractors, not employees. “In the Bay Area, that contribution is going to buy a lot less than it would in Southern California,” Kominski said. “We’re a big state and have a lot of variation of health care costs.” It also ran in Physician’s Weekly, Health Leaders, the Saratogian (NY), and News Medical.

Emerging Industry Leaders: Efrain Talamantes

Managed Healthcare Executive (Oct. 29) interviewed UCLA Fielding School of Public Health alum Dr. Efrain Talamantes (MS, ‘13), chief operating officer of AltaMed Health Services in Los Angeles, after recognizing him as one of “10 Emerging Industry Leaders” in its fourth annual such ranking. “The healthcare industry has trailed behind in embracing people of color in leadership. I’ve learned that my patients and colleagues benefit from my partnership in solving some of today’s most pressing challenges,” Talamantes said. “If we co-design our healthcare delivery system with underrepresented groups in mind, we can improve the health of those who suffer most.”

The Consequences of Not Drinking Enough Water Throughout the Day

Well+Good (Oct. 28) interviewed Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about the importance of drinking enough water, as water is required to perform nearly every bodily function. “The blood vessels around our brains are very sensitive, so if you do not drink sufficient water, they may react to the change in blood volume, and that may increase the likelihood of headache,” Hunnes said. It also ran on MSN.

“App-Based Companies Pushing Prop. 22 say Drivers Will get Health Benefits. Will They?”

California Healthline (Oct. 28) interviewed Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the impact on health care of California’s Proposition 22, which would keep drivers classified as independent contractors, not employees. “In the Bay Area, that contribution is going to buy a lot less than it would in Southern California,” Kominski said. “We’re a big state and have a lot of variation of health care costs.”

Opinion: After the Election, Health Care Looms as the Same Irresistible Force, Immovable Object

The Jackson (MS) Clarion-Ledger (Oct. 28) published a column about the politics of health care that cited Gerald Kominski, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management. “…Kominski, director of UCLA’s Center for Health Policy Research, (said) so-called `super-users’ in two categories significantly drive up the overall cost of health care delivery.”

Fewer Reproductive Restrictions Directly Linked to Healthier Babies

Ghair Ryhydd (Oct. 28, Wales) referenced May Sudhinaraset, associate professor of the UCLA Fielding School’s Department of Community Health Sciences, in a story about her study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, which found American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies.

A Skin Test for Parkinson's Diagnosis?

Medscape (Oct. 28) quoted Dr. Beate Ritz, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and of environmental health sciences, about research that suggests it possible to diagnose Parkinson's disease with a skin test.

Best Hiking Trails to see Fall Colors

The Patch (Oct. 28) referenced Michael Jerrett, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of environmental health sciences, in a story about a study that found exposure to nature — including water and green spaces — can help reduce inflammation, chronic stress and symptoms of depression.

Opinion: “Californians, Vote Yes on Prop. 16”

The New York Times’ Editorial Board (Oct. 27), citing research by David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, called for Californians to support Proposition 16 and consider race in public university admissions. “Latinos comprise 40 percent of California’s population but roughly only 6 percent of its practicing physicians,” the authors wrote. “(Hayes-Bautista’s research) attribute(s) this shortfall largely to Proposition 209, which substantially cut the number of Latino U.C. medical school graduates.”

Reproductive Rights Benefits Babies' Health

The Doctor (Oct. 26) interviewed May Sudhinaraset, associate professor of the UCLA Fielding School’s Department of Community Health Sciences, about a study she led, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, which found American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies. “There are real threats that undermine reproductive rights,” Sudhinaraset said. “Providing access to family planning and abortion services (has consequences) for (a mother’s) health and her children’s health.”

Less Restrictive Reproductive Policies Lead to Healthier Babies

Medical News Today (Oct. 26) interviewed May Sudhinaraset, associate professor of the UCLA Fielding School’s Department of Community Health Sciences, about a study she led, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, which found American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies. “Our study provides evidence that reproductive rights policies play a critical role in advancing maternal and child health equity,” Sudhinaraset said. “Despite the increasing restrictions on reproductive rights in recent years, there are remarkably few empirical studies assessing the association between state-level restrictive reproductive policies and adverse birth outcomes by nativity status and race/ethnicity.”