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 FSPH In The News

FSPH In The News - for the week of September 27, 2020 - 12:00am

Week of: 
September 27, 2020 to October 3, 2020

FEATURES (COVID-19 broadcast)

COVID-19: Have the president’s actions led to spread of the virus?

MSNBC (Oct. 2) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about actions of the Trump Administration and the campaign in the period after the latest outbreak among White House staff. “The CDC guidelines are clear: if you’ve been exposed to somebody who has been infected with COPVID-19, who tests positive, you quarantine for 14 days,” Rimoin said. “Testing does not prevent the test taker from getting infected; what it’s meant for is to pull people out of circulation who are infected so they can isolate and stop chains of transmission.”

COVID-19: Doctors discuss experimental drug and contact tracing for President Trump

KTTV-TV (Oct. 2) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the president's diagnosis and contact tracing of those exposed at one or more of his events. “We've seen the complexity of contact tracing play out over and over again during this pandemic,” Rimoin said. “It's very difficult when you have an airborne virus that is spread easily through the air, spread through multiple people at a time and be able to track down who has been infected.”

COVID-19: “The president does fall into a high risk category”

CNN (Oct. 1) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the breaking news that President Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus. “This just shows how important testing, tracing, quarantining, and isolating is here,” Rimoin said. “The president does fall into a high risk category, he’s older, he is somewhat overweight (and) he is in an age group that does have risk for severe COVID. This is very concerning.” The interview ran on multiple outlets, including KITV-TV (ABC affiliate, Hawaii) and WRCB-TV (NBC affiliate, Tennessee), among others.

COVID-19: “The virus is what the virus is”

NBC (Oct. 1) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the breaking news that President Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus. “The virus is what the virus is, and transmission precautions doesn’t matter if you are the president of the United States or anyone else,” Rimoin said. “When you test positive for coronavirus, then you must isolate from other people, and anybody who has come in contact with you, needs to quarantine for 14 days.”

COVID-19: Thousands of older Californians are economically insecure

KPCC-FM (Oct. 1) interviewed Steven P. Wallace, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and associate director of FSPH’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about findings from a study he led that found an older adult in California needs more than double the minimum income established by the federal poverty index to survive. “You can imagine, if you’re in a household, you have an adult child with you now that you’re helping feed,” Wallace said. “You’re helping your grandchildren. You’ve been laid off or furloughed. These numbers were during a relatively healthy economic period, so you can imagine that they would be going up.”

COVID-19: Climate change is the existential issue

The Spectrum One (Sept. 30) flagship “Inside the Issues” program interviewed Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor of health policy and management, aboutthe new Center for Healthy Climate Solutions at the university. “Climate change is the existential issue; that means it effects our very existence,” Fielding said. “We have the know-how to solve the problem (of COVID-19); we don’t have the know-how to solve climate change.”

COVID-19: “We are still in the thick of it”

CNN (Sept. 28) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the state of the pandemic in the United States, and the messages coming from the White House. I don’t think the American public should be listening to the White House press briefings as the sole way of determining where we are or not where we are with this virus,” Rimoin said. “If you listen to the public health professionals, they will tell you we are we are still in the thick of it.”

COVID-19: The U.S. is “going to see an uptick in cases”

MSNBC (Sept. 28) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about what to expect in the coming months in the pandemic. “When you start to lift restrictions, when you have widespread community transmission, you’re going to see an uptick in cases,” Rimoin said. “And then you’re going to see an uptick in hospitalizations, and then you’re very likely to see an uptick in deaths.”

COVID-19: No Labor Day Surge in Los Angeles County

KPCC-FM (Sept. 28) interviewed Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and community health sciences, on the flagship “Air Talk” program about the state of the pandemic in Los Angeles County. “We are making some progress; we had the first wave and we plateaued out and then we had a surge again after July and we are now coming back down off of that,” Kim-Farley said. “We’re not out of the woods, but it means we may be able to start opening up a bit more.”

COVID-19: Turning the corner on the pandemic?

CNN (Sept. 27) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the state of the pandemic in the United States. “There is no indication that we are turning any corner, except the corner towards more cases,” Rimoin said. “As people turn to move indoors, they create more opportunity for the virus to spread. There is no indication, whatsoever that this virus is slowing down.”

 

FEATURES (COVID-19 text and online)

COVID-19: Next few days are 'the real test' in Trump’s battle

USA Today (Oct. 3) interviewed Dr. David Eisenman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences, about the possible course of President Donald Trump’s infection. Eisenman said patients tend to see short-term fluctuations in their symptoms throughout their illness, so doctors often evaluate a COVID-19 patient's progress over the course of days. As of Saturday evening, the information released by the White House was not enough for him to evaluate Trump's progress. The story ran widely, including the South China Morning Post, Detroit Free Press, Cincinnati Enquirer, Yahoo News, and at least 58 other outlets.

COVID-19: Airlines look to help ailing industry with testing at airports

The Los Angeles Times (Oct. 2) Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about plans for airlines to provide coronavirus tests that passengers can take before boarding a flight. “If it’s an accurate test, a good one, it will help,” Brewer said. “It won’t eliminate the risk, but it will reduce it.” The story ran on multiple outlets, including MSN Lifestyle and Novelles du Monde (France).

COVID-19: What makes N95 and KN95 the gold standard of masks

Men’s Health (Oct. 2) interviewed Dr. Timothy Brewer, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, about the differences between N95 and KN95 masks, and the importance of a proper fit. “Somebody needs to make sure you put it on properly, it’s sealed correctly, and so that it's doing what it's supposed to do,” Brewer said.

COVID-19: Here’s what CDC guidelines say should happen next

The Armenian Reporter (Oct. 2) quoted Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the breaking news that President Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus. “This is very concerning,” Rimoin said. “The number of people that could potentially be exposed and at risk of contracting this virus is significant here.”

COVID-19: Does the president have a chance to change his public health rhetoric?

Business Insider (Oct. 1) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the potential public policy impact of news that President Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus. “This is a critical moment," Rimoin said. "It's better to learn sooner than later. And the example that Donald Trump and the entire White House should be setting is one of social responsibility and good public-health guidance.” It also ran on Yahoo News, Elexonic, and News Site.

COVID-19: You should not be socializing indoors

Elemental (Oct. 1) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the importance of physical distancing during the pandemic. “Trying to figure out how to socialize safely is really difficult,” Rimoin said. “But it’s much easier to stay out of trouble than to get out of trouble … we need to be doing our best to reduce the spread of the virus; not give it more opportunities.”

COVID-19: We will not let the coronavirus take Halloween

The Los Angeles Times (Sept. 30, Spanish) quoted interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about how to have a safe Halloween during the pandemic. “Viruses don't rest on vacation,” Rimoin said. “Until the community has low transmission rates, many things will not return to normal. The way a virus is transmitted does not change because we are in vacation mode. In fact, it often makes us less cautious because our guard is down. We have to accept the fact that the virus is dictating the precautions we must take.”

COVID-19: Research into SARS-CoV-2 mutation “hotspots” raises implications for vaccines and therapeutics

Science News (Sept. 29) quoted Christina Ramirez, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of biostatistics, about a study she co-authored for the journal Virus Research that found at least 10 distinct “hotspot” mutations in more than 80% of randomly selected SAR-CoV-2 sequences from six countries, and these genome hotspots – seen as "typos" that can occur as the virus replicates during cellular division – could have a significant impact in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. “These hotspots might select for more pathogenic variants,” Ramirez said. “Alternatively, mutations might evolve and could prove to be less pathogenic – the virus, after all, only survives when the host survives.” The piece also ran in Health Care Times.

COVID-19: Movies and museums are coming back. Should you?

The New York Times (Sept. 27) interviewed Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and director of the Fielding School’s UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, about the risks of cultural attractions. “If you walk in and feel it’s unsafe, or it doesn’t meet the standards for mask-wearing, you always have the option to leave,” Rimoin said. “Trust your gut.”

COVID-19: What will concerts be like post-pandemic?

The Palm Springs Desert Sun (Sept. 27) interviewed Dr. Richard Jackson, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about what the post-pandemic concert experience may be like. “Your biggest risk is the guy next to you sneezing and breathing in your face, (and) going to the bar and being eight inches from somebody else's face whose got a runny nose, coughing and not wearing a mask,” Jackson said. “The day where you reach into your wallet or pocket and put a bunch of dollar bills on a counter where a guy picks them up and puts them in with everyone else's money, I think those days are ending.”

 

FEATURES (Other)

Proposition 16: How we begin to address the Latino physician shortage

The Bakersfield Californian (Oct. 3) published a commentary co-authored by David Hayes-Bautista, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, about the potential impact of Proposition 16, on the November ballot in California, on the number of Latino physicians in the state. “The root of the Latino physician shortage lies in the barriers Latinos face in education and careers in medicine,” the authors wrote. “Overcoming these obstacles will not be easy, but restoring affirmative action programs with Proposition 16 is a critical start.”

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health efforts spotlighted in ASPPH Friday Letter

The ASPPH Friday Letter (Oct. 2) reported eight items related to UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts, FSPH efforts related to the pandemic, or other news. These included a Q&A with Chandra Ford, professor of Community Health Sciences, and a feature on Dean Ron Brookmeyer, distinguished professor of biostatistics, Alina Dorian, associate dean for public health practice at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and professor and department chair of community health sciences, Michael Prelip. The Letter also listed the Oct. 9 Paul Torrens Health Forum, led by professor of health policy and management Gerald Kominski under “Events.” Under “Members in the News,” the Letter listed a Xinhua interview of Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, distinguished professor of epidemiology, along with a California Healthline interview of Dr. Jonathan Fielding, distinguished professor of health policy and management, and Michael Jerrett, professor of environmental health sciences, aboutthe new Center for Healthy Climate Solutions at the university. The Letter also listed a separate feature about Dr. Jonathan Fielding, Michael Jerrett, and the new Center for Healthy Climate Solutions. Under “Student and Alumni Achievement,” the Letter listed a feature on Chandra Ford and researchers (Natalie Bradford, Millicent N. Robinson, Taylor B. Rogers, James Huynh, Anna Hing, and Ezinne Nwankwo) at the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health. Under the same category, the Letter also listed a feature on Virginia C. Li, research professor/professor emerita of community health sciences, and her work with Chinese visiting scholars and alums, including Dr. Zunyou Wu, FSPH professor of epidemiology.

“Trump says insulin is now so cheap, it’s ‘like water.’ It isn’t”

The Los Angeles Times (Oct. 1) interviewed Jack Needleman, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management, for a column about President Donald Trumps’ comments during a presidential debate about the cost of prescription drugs, including insulin, used to treat diabetes and other conditions. “As with so much about healthcare, Trump has promised much and delivered little,” Needleman said. “Promises to lower prescription drug prices dramatically have been followed with proposals that are small or not implemented … vials of insulin continue to cost around $300, far more than even the most overpriced bottled water, much less the tap water available in our homes.” It also ran on MSN Money.

Use of technology-based approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer varies across the U.S.

Renal & Urology News (Oct. 1) interviewed Dr. Mark Litwin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of health policy and management and professor and chair of urology at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, about human factors in the use of different techniques. “It really comes down in part to just how user-friendly this technology is for the doctors who are responsible for operationalizing it,” Litwin said. “The earlier they are out from their training, the more open they are to novel improvements, and the farther out they are, as a general rule, the more set in their ways they get.” The story also ran in Medical Health News.

Number of Californians with mental health distress sharply increased from 2014 to 2018

MedicalXPress (Oct. 1) quoted D. Imelda Padilla-Frausto, a researcher with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about a policy brief on mental health care published by the Center. “It is critical to look at structural and social factors such as education, income, employment and discrimination that may be related to mental health inequities," Padilla-Frausto said. “This can help explain why a high percentage of adults who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual have experienced serious distress and why the number of people in that group reporting serious distress has continued to increase.” Similar stories ran in InfoSurHoy, the Sierra Sun Times, Mirage News and Brinkwire.

Climate change is the existential issue

The Spectrum One (Sept. 30) flagship “Inside the Issues” program interviewed Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor of health policy and management, aboutthe new Center for Healthy Climate Solutions at the university. “Climate change is the existential issue; that means it effects our very existence,” Fielding said. “We have the know-how to solve the problem (of COVID-19); we don’t have the know-how to solve climate change.”

Older Latinos face serious challenges to survive in California

EFE (Sept. 30, Spanish) interviewed Steven P. Wallace, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of community health sciences and associate director of FSPH’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, about findings from a study he led that found an older adult in California needs more than double the minimum income established by the federal poverty index to survive. In addition, the measurement “applies to all places, and the differences in the cost of living in different areas of the country are not taken into account," Wallace said. The story also ran in Yahoo Noticias, Tu Noticias, Noticias Xtra, LatinxToday, and Noticias Alianza.

Healthy high-fat foods to keep you full and satisfied

Self (Sept. 30) interviewed Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about so-called “healthy fats,” referring to foods rich in unsaturated fats. “These are among the healthiest of all fats,” Hunnes said. The story also ran on MSN Health and Yahoo.

All-electric building codes for new homes would protect our health – and our kids’ health

CalMatters (Sept. 30) published a commentary that referenced a study led by Yifang Zhu, professor of environmental health sciences and associate dean for academic programs at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, that found that after an hour of using a gas-fired stove or oven, levels of nitrogen dioxide inside California homes reached levels that exceeded both state and national ambient air-quality standards.

Additives found in cold cuts, ice cream, bread, other processed food cause concern

The Washington Post (Sept. 28) quoted Dana Hunnes, assistant professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about food additives, including sorbitol, a sugar alcohol that has about half the calories of sugar but also about half the sweetness. “Sorbitol brings water into the colon and acts as a laxative,” Hunnes said. “That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but at high doses it can have unwanted side effects, such as bloating, gas, and diarrhea.”

How does climate change exacerbate racial, ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities?

The Bakersfield Californian (Sept. 28)published aninterview of Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor of health policy and management, and Michael Jerrett, professor of environmental health sciences, aboutthe new Center for Healthy Climate Solutions at the university, including research into how climate change exacerbates health disparities. “If you look through very long periods of time, people who have more resources — whether that's better social contacts or they're more highly educated, or have higher incomes, or other factors that put them at a social advantage — have always been able to protect themselves from environmental risks better than people who lack those resources,” Jerrett said.

UCLA FSPH Alum Mai Vang makes mark in local politics in Sacramento

CapRadio (Sept. 28, Sacramento NPR station KXJZ-FM) interviewed UCLA Fielding School of Public Health alum Mai Vang (MPH, ’11), a member of the Sacramento City Unified School District’s board now in a November runoff for a seat on the Sacramento City Council. “As women of color, we understand the intersectionality of race and gender, and how it plays out in the realities of our own lives every day,” Vang said. “It is time for Sacramento to have bold and courageous leadership.”